cant language

14 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Also a term for money; probably because Coal in the cant language signifies money. Cited from Romano Lavo-Lil, by George Borrow
  • The Crack Lay, of late is used, in the cant language, to signify the art and mystery of house-breaking. Cited from 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,by Cpt. Grose
  • The captain, chief, or ringleader of the gang of misrule: in the cant language called also the upright man. Cited from 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,by Cpt. Grose
  • They closed around the fire and held deep consultation together; but the low tone in which they spoke, and the cant language which they used, prevented Brown from understanding much of their conversation. Cited from Guy Mannering, Vol. I, by Sir Walter Scott
  • In the Spanish cant language, Guro signifies an alguazil, a kind of civil officer. Cited from Romano Lavo-Lil, by George Borrow
  • They closed around the fire, and held deep consultation together; but the low tone in which they spoke, and the cant language which they used, prevented Brown from understanding much of their conversation. Cited from Guy Mannering, by Walter Scott
  • Very few people can read Villon's longer poems at all, for they are almost entirely written in cant language, and the glossary must be in constant requisition. Cited from The Ethics of Drink and Other Social Questions, by James Runciman
  • Both also, in their strong, easy colloquial way, tend to become difficult and obscure; the obscurity in the case of Villon passing at times into the absolute darkness of cant language. Cited from Familiar Studies of Men & Books, by Stevenson
  • Persons chained or handcuffed together, in order to be conveyed to gaol, or on board the lighters for transportation, are in the cant language said to be married together. Cited from 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue,by Cpt. Grose
  • I know well that there is a cant language current, about the difference between an exclusion from employments, even to the most rigorous extent, and an exclusion from the natural benefits arising from a man's own industry. Cited from Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. IV. (of 12), by Burke
  • Those who were convalescent talked ribaldry in a loud tone, or whispered to each other in cant language, upon schemes which, as far as a passing phrase could be understood by a novice, had relation to violent and criminal exploits. Cited from The Surgeon's Daughter, by Sir Walter Scott
  • The Romans of the decadence had a hideous cant language which fairly matched the grossness of the people, and the Gauls, with their descendants, fairly matched the old conquerors. Cited from The Ethics of Drink and Other Social Questions, by James Runciman
  • And the poor debtors re-echoed THE LIBERTIES OF NEWGATE, which, in the cant language, signifies plunder, as loudly as the thieves themselves. Cited from Jonathan Wild, by Henry Fielding
  • He was terribly disguised with his grotesque rags, his staff, his knotted hair, and with the more disgusting contrivances to excite pity, still practised among a class of our mendicants, who, in their cant language, are still said "to sham Abraham." Cited from Curiosities of Literature, Vol. II (of 3), by Isaac Disraeli