cant-hooks

20 examples (0.03 sec)
  • We found, however, that small "cant hooks" were more easily handled and did better work. Cited from Scientific American Supplement, No. 623, December 10, 1887, by Various
  • The latter are similar to cant-hooks, except that they have sharp pikes at their ends. Cited from Handwork in Wood, by William Noyes
  • As fast as they were prepared, men with cant-hooks rolled them down the slope to a flat below the falls. Cited from The Riverman, by Stewart Edward White
  • Going up against the current, only poles and cant hooks -- tedious going. Cited from Slave Narratives: South Carolina, Pt. 2, by Work Projects Admin.
  • Group after group of laborers, peavies or cant-hooks on shoulders, were moving slowly past him toward the wharf. Cited from Calumet "K", by Samuel Merwin and Henry Kitchell Webster
  • Mike and Bob were running the cant-hooks, while Jim stood on top of the great pile of logs already decked. Cited from The Blazed Trail, by Stewart Edward White
  • One by one the helpers seized them with their cant-hooks, crowded them into the chutes and hurried them along to the whirling saws. Cited from The Wonderful Adventures of Nils, by Selma Lagerloef
  • A horse hitched to the end of the chain hauls up the log, which is guided by the "send-up men" with their cant-hooks. Cited from Handwork in Wood, by William Noyes
  • The wrapping chains are unhooked and the lower log on the skid side is worked out with cant-hooks till the whole load flattens out. Cited from Handwork in Wood, by William Noyes
  • By one way or another the log is dragged out and across the two parallel skids, on which it is rolled by cant-hooks to the end of skids toward the road way. Cited from Handwork in Wood, by William Noyes
  • A gang of men who followed the plow carried axes and cant-hooks for the purpose of repairing extemporaneously just such defects, which never would have been discovered otherwise than by the practical experience. Cited from The Blazed Trail, by Stewart Edward White
  • He ran across the tracks and out on the wharf, climbing on the timber pile, where Peterson and his gang were, rolling down the big sticks with cant-hooks. Cited from Calumet "K", by Samuel Merwin and Henry Kitchell Webster
  • After my first rice tafel I dreamed I was a log jam and that lumber jacks with cant hooks were trying to pry me apart. Cited from In Africa, by John T. McCutcheon
  • Suddenly, through the ever-open gates of the forest, teams of horses crashed, drawing after them clanking log chains, and driven by men who carried saws and "cant hooks" on their broad shoulders. Cited from The Redemption of David Corson, by Charles Frederic Goss
  • Quick as light Bob and Mike sprang forward, gripped the hooks of the cant-hooks, like great thumbs and forefingers, and, while one held with all his power, the other gave a sharp twist upward. Cited from The Blazed Trail, by Stewart Edward White
  • So soon as this took place, Johnston, accompanied by three of his best men, armed with axes and cant-hooks, leaping from log to log with the sure agility only lumbermen could show, succeeded in reaching the heart of the jam, and at once proceeded to attack it with tremendous energy. Cited from The Young Woodsman, by J. McDonald Oxley
  • On the tug's forward deck, hat off and jacket swinging loose, stood Captain Joe Bell in charge of the submarine work at the site, glorious old Captain Joe, with the body of a capstan, legs stiff as wharf posts, arms and hands tough as cant hooks and heart twice as big as all of them put together. Cited from The Veiled Lady, by F. Hopkinson Smith
  • Then began the ripping whine of saws and the wrenching clutch of cant hooks; loads of clean planks now came clattering up the rough road from the sawmill in the valley below -- men cursed over wheels sunk over their hubs in mud -- over broken axles and shifted loads. Cited from The Lady of Big Shanty, by Frank Berkeley Smith
  • At their home and hunting lodge on the Sinnemahoning at the foot of Altar Rock, famed in Indian lore, they maintained a gunshop and forge, making or repairing many of their own guns, knives, ammunition, etc., as well as their axes, saws, cant-hooks, farming implements and the like. Cited from Catalogue of Early Pennsylvania and Other Firearms, Henry W. Shoemaker
  • In the storerooms of hardware firms porters carried and clerks checked off chains, strap iron, bolts, spikes, staples, band iron, bar iron, peavies, cant-hooks, pike-poles, sledge-hammers, blocks, ropes, and cables. Cited from The Riverman, by Stewart Edward White