bygone centuries

27 examples (0.03 sec)
  • If other countries acted in a similar manner, how could the grievances of bygone centuries ever be forgotten? Cited from Is Ulster Right?, by Anonymous ["By An Irishman"]
  • Rather the reverse; it is, if anything, taken away, and the soil must be less rich now than it was in bygone centuries. Cited from The Open Air, by Richard Jefferies
  • I have, in bygone Centuries, held many high disputations in the Church. Cited from The Well of Saint Clare, by Anatole France
  • For example, everyday life on the farm in bygone centuries is portrayed by a series of rooms laid out in historical fashion and various old-time farming methods are demonstrated.
  • Indeed, however much many of the botanists of bygone centuries might try to discredit this popular delusion, they do not seem to have been wholly free from its influence themselves. Cited from The Folk-lore of Plants, by T. F. Thiselton-Dyer
  • They seemed to be lingering in bygone centuries. Cited from Twilight in Italy, by D.H. Lawrence
  • We are not bound by the precedents of bygone centuries in our organization; we are free to take from the past what is of worth to us, and we are free to let the rest go. Cited from Some Christian Convictions, by Henry Sloane Coffin
  • Bad Sobernheim is home to several former landholds once belonging to noblemen or monasteries in bygone centuries.
  • From the misty ages of bygone centuries to the present day there has been a gradual interlinking of the literatures of different countries. Cited from The Interdependence of Literature, Georgina Curtis
  • And even this sense and this morality of bygone centuries are not understood by the "healthy commonsense" of to-day. Cited from Selected Essays, by Karl Marx
  • The house is built on a very extensive scale, and is ornamented in the interior with carvings in wood of many of the kings and princes of bygone centuries. Cited from Three Years in Europe, by W. Wells Brown
  • The Cukkemanes' primary occupation in bygone centuries was as per their birth into the Brahmin Community, pourohitya - priest.
  • And certainly, as regards the Jacksons of bygone centuries, the assertion seems justified. Cited from Stonewall Jackson And The American Civil War, by G. F. R. Henderson
  • All our Parliaments are modelled on the necessities of bygone centuries. Cited from Proportional Representation Applied To Party Government, by Ashworth
  • Another time he was absorbed in the crowded life of the city, which appeared to him as a great, crude, moving picture in which the life of bygone centuries was reflected as in a mirror. Cited from The Precipice, by Ivan Goncharov
  • There are currently roughly 250 inhabitants in Altweidelbach, but in bygone centuries, the population was quite a bit smaller, and fluctuated considerably.
  • He was like those noble youngsters of bygone centuries who, graced in their cradles by the rank of colonel from the monarch, played around with hoop and top till they were old enough to join their regiments. Cited from The Torrent (Entre Naranjos), by Vicente Blasco Ibanez
  • She adds zest to her plots by wafting her heroines to distant climes and bygone centuries, and by playing on their nerves with superstitious fears. Cited from The Tale of Terror, by Edith Birkhead
  • The Kirchberger Heimatmuseum (local history museum) on Eifelgasse gives the visitor an impression of the townsfolk's lives in bygone centuries.
  • This widespread popularity is an indication of the eagerness with which readers of 1765 desired to escape from the present and to revel for a time in strange, bygone centuries. Cited from The Tale of Terror, by Edith Birkhead
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