Brussels lace

73 examples (0.04 sec)
  • I could see nothing but the pattern of the Brussels lace as she drew back. Cited from Room in the Dragon Volant, by J. Sheridan LeFanu
  • I'll bring thee over a silk gown, and such Brussels lace as you've never yet set eyes on. Cited from The Ferryman of Brill, by William H. G. Kingston
  • When the prohibition ended in 1699, Brussels lace began to become popular again.
  • Brussels lace is well known for its delicacy and beauty.
  • To this day all Brussels lace is called Point d'Angleterre in France.
  • Her head-dress was a Brussels-lace mob, peculiarly adapted to the charming air and turn of her features. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9),by Samuel Richardson
  • Brussels lace cost more than Mechlin lace, and was in high demand in England and France.
  • Imagine your Richard sleeping under a coverlet of real Brussels lace! Cited from Bred in the Bone, by James Payn
  • I had hundreds of pounds worth of Valenciennes and Brussels lace hid -- you would never guess where. Cited from Helen, by Maria Edgeworth
  • The veinings of leaves are often worked in Venetian bars, over a ground of Brussels lace. Cited from The Ladies' Work-Book, by Unknown
  • France also had regulations forbidding the importation of foreign lace, so the Brussels lace sold in France was sold under this name.
  • If a man steals a kiss there, I suppose he does penance in a sheet of Brussels lace. Cited from Letters of Horace Walpole v3, Horace Walpole
  • Also, the plait is shorter, and the mesh smaller than those of Brussels lace.
  • You might have chosen the mantilla with the Brussels lace. Cited from German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VII
  • Light-gray satin, quite plain, with only Brussels lace flounces. Cited from Courts of Memory, by L. de Hegermann-Lindencrone
  • The whole beauty of Brussels lace depends upon the evenness of the stitches. Cited from Beeton's Book of Needlework, by Isabella Beeton
  • The Brussels lace is superior to all other lace, so beautiful, so multiform, so expensive -- four hundred francs a pound. Cited from New Tabernacle Sermons, by Thomas De Witt Talmage
  • This fine thread is part of what prevented mechanizing the process of making Brussels lace, as well as the production of it in other regions, as it could not be bought anywhere else.
  • I am involved in a whirlwind of haberdashery, Brussels lace, diamonds. Cited from Nancy, by Rhoda Broughton
  • Better complete, thought she, the other and smaller pieces -- one a fichu of Brussels lace, and the others some embroidered handkerchiefs on which she was to place monograms. Cited from Felix O'Day, by F. Hopkinson Smith
  • Next »