bruise it

23 examples (0.02 sec)
  • If I touch a sore, I do not bruise it with my heel. Cited from The Bravo, by J. Fenimore Cooper
  • Open thy heart to God and let him bruise it, let sorrow flow in and break it, that sweetness may flow out. Cited from How to Live a Holy Life, by C. E. Orr
  • If I were a man of muscle, it would be pleasant to get his head in chancery, and bruise it. Cited from Humorous Masterpieces from American Literature, by Various
  • If I myself give the larva a wound, if I bruise it, the whole body very soon turns brown and begins to rot. Cited from The Life of the Fly, by J. Henri Fabre
  • These worshipers torture the flesh by beating it thus and bruise it black. Cited from Modern Persia, by Mooshie G. Daniel
  • Even if they were not, it was too far-fetched a supposition to imagine a man gripping his own arm hard enough to bruise it. Cited from The Moon Rock, by Arthur J. Rees
  • Lay it on a flat plate and bruise it with the blade of a knife. Cited from The Whitehouse Cookbook (1887), by Mrs. F.L. Gillette
  • Lay it on a flat plate, and bruise it with the blade of a knife. Cited from Directions for Cookery, by Eliza Leslie
  • It is as if she should wilfully injure her own person, bruise it with stones or sear it with hot irons. Cited from An Algonquin Maiden, by G. Mercer Adam
  • And for a little, holding her tremulous hand upon his finger-tips as though he feared to bruise it with a ruder contact, he could not take his eyes from her. Cited from The Lone Wolf, by Louis Joseph Vance
  • No arrow can pierce it, no club bruise it, no pestle pulverize it, no chemistry disintegrate it. Cited from The Destiny of the Soul, by William Rounseville Alger
  • When done take the bread out, bruise it and thicken the sauce: add flour and a little butter, and boil it up. Cited from Burroughs' Encyclopaedia, 1889, by Barkham Burroughs
  • Can you tell why it hurts us to prick the flesh with a pin, or to pinch or burn or bruise it? Cited from First Book in Physiology and Hygiene, by J.H. Kellogg
  • Now let the pliant basket plaited be Of bramble-twigs; now set your corn to parch Before the fire; now bruise it with the stone. Cited from The Georgics [English] by Virgil/Vergil
  • The young bird struggled valiantly with the cicada, but made no head way in swallowing it, when the mother took it from him and flew to the sidewalk, and proceeded to break and bruise it more thoroughly. Cited from Birds and Bees, Sharp Eyes, Etc, by John Burroughs
  • Bruise it ever so lightly, no matter where, on the cap, the stem, the tubes of the undersurface: forthwith, the wounded part, originally a pure white, is tinted a beautiful blue. Cited from The Life of the Fly, by J. Henri Fabre
  • If my vain soul needs blows and bitter losses To shape it for Thy crown, Then bruise it, burn it, burden it with crosses, With sorrows bear it down. Cited from Maurine and Other Poems, by Ella Wheeler Wilcox
  • But it is a sensitive plant, the soul of a young and naturally amiable girl; rough blasts may bruise it; even excessive nurture may cause an exuberance of growth and weaken the roots. Cited from The Fool Errant, by Maurice Hewlett
  • Take a piece of juicy beef, without any fat, cut it in small pieces, bruise it till tender, put it in a wide-mouthed bottle, and cork it tight; put this in a pot of cold water, set it over the fire, and let it boil an hour or more. Cited from Domestic Cookery, by Elizabeth E. Lea
  • "I usually bruise it in the mortar before cooking, without breaking up the fibre too much, and then I heat up the little cupel furnace to about 600 C, and put the steak in on a tripod." Cited from The Red Thumb Mark, by R. Austin Freeman
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