bruise blue

20 examples (0.04 sec)
  • When injured it bruises blue very slowly and may hardly change color at all in some cases.
  • It bruises blue only after several hours of exposure to air.
  • Have the boys been good who show Scratches red and bruises blue? Cited from The Bay and Padie Book, by Furnley Maurice
  • They bruise blue in some specimens (although not generally in Western Australia).
  • It has small orange-red pores that become rusty with age, and bruise blue to black.
  • The flesh is white to cream, and does not bruise blue when injured or exposed to air by cutting.
  • The pores are initially red, but have an overall orange colour when mature, and they bruise blue.
  • The flesh is yellow to dirty yellow, up to thick, and inconsistently bruises blue when cut or broken.
  • The fruit body has greenish tones and bruises blue where damaged.
  • The cap surface is pale brown to reddish brown in color, hygrophanous, and bruises blue where damaged.
  • The upper part of the stipe bruises blue-green.
  • The entire mushroom quickly bruises blue where it is handled.
  • The flesh is thin and bruises blue easily.
  • The pores underneath the cap are yellow, and bruise blue or green before fading somewhat.
  • The cap flesh is yellow, and slowly and erratically bruises blue in North American specimens.
  • As is characteristic of psilocybin mushrooms, all parts of the fruit body bruise blue when handled or injured.
  • The pores are lemon yellow, small and round, and bruise blue.
  • The pores on the cap undersurface are butter yellow, and may also bruise blue, although this is less likely in young specimens.
  • The pores and tubes are pale yellow, with the pores being small and round, and they do 'not' bruise blue.
  • It readily bruises blue when handled, the younger specimens bruising bluish olivacous or even blackish.