bravado

All Noun
1,500 examples (0.01 sec)
  • If all were lost but her physical strength and bravado, then she must use them. Cited from A Son of the Hills, by Harriet T. Comstock
  • A feeling of bravado came over them, and they did not mind being seen together. Cited from Serge Panine, by Georges Ohnet, v3
  • The small figure in blue drew itself together with a certain bravado and came forward. Cited from Charles Rex, by Ethel M. Dell
  • It was difficult to keep up an air of bravado under these circumstances. Cited from Two Boys and a Fortune, by Matthew White, Jr.
  • It had been bravado with him up to the time that he knew this girl was coming out. Cited from The Sagebrusher, by Emerson Hough
  • I knew that he did not feel the bravado that was in his tone. Cited from Brigands of the Moon, by Ray Cummings
  • He threw back his head, all his bravado returned to him. Cited from To Have and To Hold, by Mary Johnston
  • Now was the hour for bravado, since the time for silence had gone. Cited from The Half-Hearted, by John Buchan
  • With a sense of bravado she stepped out into the entrance hall again. Cited from The Blood Red Dawn, by Charles Caldwell Dobie
  • Her only course lay in the bravado that alone kept her from collapse. Cited from The Sheik, by E. M. Hull
  • Perhaps there was more than a little of the spirit of bravado in the call he proposed to pay. Cited from The Cruise of the Jasper B., by Don Marquis
  • His step was firm, and he showed neither fear nor bravado. Cited from The Book of the Bush, by George Dunderdale
  • I do protest if this action of mine in the chart room may seem bravado. Cited from Brigands of the Moon, by Ray Cummings
  • Her little bravado made her feel as if she ought to make amends. Cited from Sister Carrie, by Theodore Dreiser
  • After this bit of bravado I felt better, and I thought over the situation. Cited from The Stark Munro Letters, by Arthur Conan Doyle #4
  • It looked rather like the bravado of a man who lived for the sake of fighting. Cited from Gunman's Reckoning, by Max Brand
  • Was it to put her on her guard or was it in a spirit of bravado? Cited from Constance Dunlap, by Arthur B. Reeve
  • I saw, too, that his manner had lost all bravado. Cited from Montlivet, by Alice Prescott Smith
  • Then she gave her address on the Avenue, with something of bravado in her voice. Cited from Love Stories, by Mary Roberts Rinehart
  • Instead, the fear of death removed, they assumed their former bravado. Cited from The Mucker, by Edgar Rice Burroughs
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Words starting with bravado

Meaning of bravado

  • noun A swaggering show of courage