braid may

11 examples (0.03 sec)
  • If the crown is too high, a few rows of braid may be removed at the bottom of the crown, enough to give the desired height. Cited from Make Your Own Hats, by Gene Allen Martin
  • An improperly done braid may fall out if too loose, or if left in too long may cause discomfort and itching to the horse.
  • If the edge is left plain, a few rows of lacey-looking braid may be sewed on the edge. Cited from Make Your Own Hats, by Gene Allen Martin
  • The tail is not braided in dressage, as it is thought that an uncomfortable braid may cause the horse to carry the tail stiffly.
  • Ravellings of the braid may be used as invisible couching threads for stitching it down. Cited from Embroidery and Tapestry Weaving, by Grace Christie
  • Some kinds of braid may be dampened before pressing, but it is safer to experiment first with a small piece, for some braid is ruined by pressing. Cited from Make Your Own Hats, by Gene Allen Martin
  • If the brim is too wide, a few rows of braid may be removed from the edge, and the edge refinished with one or more rows of ornamental braid of the same color. Cited from Make Your Own Hats, by Gene Allen Martin
  • The braid may be secured by wrapping with a lock of hair reserved from the braid, or by taping.
  • If it seems necessary to use an edge wire, this last row of braid may be made to cover it, or a bias fold of satin, silk, velvet, or ribbon may be sewed over the wire. Cited from Make Your Own Hats, by Gene Allen Martin
  • When the brim is very much wider at some points, short pieces of braid may be worked in at intervals as the braid is sewed; this would not make such an abrupt curve, and the general lines of the braid would be more pleasing. Cited from Make Your Own Hats, by Gene Allen Martin
  • The braid may be pinned on the brim of wire and sewed, being careful not to attach the braid to the frame; slip the needle over the wire and finish sewing the braid while it is still pinned to the brim, then remove, press slightly, and sew a facing of braid to the under side of the brim if desired. Cited from Make Your Own Hats, by Gene Allen Martin