Braid-Beard

22 examples (0.02 sec)
  • And such, if Braid-Beard spoke truth, it had formerly been. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • And, introductory to landing, Braid-Beard proceeded to give us some little account of the island, and its rulers. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. II (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • And something like this, also, Braid-Beard repeated. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • Whereupon Braid-Beard unrolled his old chronicles; and regaled us with the history, which will be found in the following chapter. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • The first was Mohi, or Braid-Beard, so called from the manner in which he wore that appendage, exceedingly long and gray. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • While Braid-Beard was recounting these things, the currents were sweeping us over a strait, toward a deep green island, bewitching to behold. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. II (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • A polished thigh- bone; by Braid-Beard declared once Teei's the Murdered. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • Perceive you, Braid-Beard, that the trade-wind blows dead across this strait from Dominora, and not from Verdanna? Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. II (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • Not an hour ago, Braid-Beard was telling us that story of prince Ottimo, who inodorous while living, expressed much delight at the prospect of being perfumed and embalmed, when dead. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • I deal in pure conceits of my own; which have a shapeliness and a unity, however unsubstantial; but you, Braid-Beard, deal in mangled realities. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • All this spake Braid-Beard, of the isle. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • Now, according to Braid-Beard, who, among other abstruse political researches, had accurately informed himself concerning the internal administration of Donjalolo's harem, the following was the method pursued therein. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • Nor is it at all impossible, Braid-Beard, that beyond their land may exist other regions, of which those strangers know not; peopled with races something like us Mardians; but perhaps with more exalted faculties, and organs that we lack. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. II (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • "Does Yillah choose rather to bower in the wild wilderness of Vivenza, than in the old vineyards of Porpheero?" said Braid-Beard. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. II (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • Embarking from Ohonoo, we at length found ourselves gliding by the pleasant shores of Tupia, an islet which according to Braid-Beard had for ages remained uninhabited by man. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • To which, Braid-Beard made answer, that they had been thus defaced by hostile devotees; who quarreling in the great gallery of the gods, and getting beside themselves with rage, often sought to pull down, and demolish each other's favorite idols. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. II (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • At this part of his narration, Mohi was interrupted by Media; who, much to the surprise of all present, observed, that, unbeknown to him (Braid-Beard), he happened to have been on that very island, at that very time, and saw that identical old lady in the very midst of those abdominal tribulations. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • Yet, as Braid-Beard assured us, sometimes it happened, that divers feeble old men zealously donning their raiment immediately after immersion became afflicted with rheumatics; and instances were related of their falling down dead, in this their pursuit of longevity. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. II (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • In truth, Braid-Beard declared, that at the time of this war, Dominora couched ten long spears for every short javelin Vivenza could dart; though the javelins were stoutly hurled as the spears. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. II (of 2), by Herman Melville
  • Among many entertaining, narrations, old Braid-Beard, crossing his calves, and peaking his beard, regaled us with some account of certain invisible spirits, ycleped the Plujii, arrant little knaves as ever gulped moonshine. Cited from Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2), by Herman Melville
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