Boring Lava

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  • The county includes a number of extinct volcanoes in the Boring Lava Field.
  • It is part of the Boring Lava Field, a zone of ancient volcanic activity in the area around Portland.
  • Portland lies on top of an extinct Plio-Pleistocene volcanic field known as the Boring Lava Field.
  • It is also part of the Boring Lava Field, a group of over 30 cinder cones in Oregon and Washington.
  • Prune Hill is an extinct volcanic vent and is part of the Boring Lava Field of northwest Oregon and southwest Washington.
  • Two dormant volcanoes from the Boring Lava Field are in the Tryon Creek watershed.
  • Mount Scott, an extinct volcano that is part of the Boring Lava Field, is the highest point in Happy Valley at, Scouters Mountain is also a prominent feature.
  • Ash, cinders, and debris from these Boring Lava Field volcanoes added another layer of sediment to the Troutdale formation.
  • The Boring Lava Field includes at least 32 cinder cones such as Mount Tabor, and its center lies in Southeast Portland.
  • The East Buttes are made up of several extinct volcanoes in and around Gresham, Oregon, United States, which are part of the Boring Lava Field.
  • Mount Sylvania is an extinct volcano, part of the Boring Lava Field, on the outskirts of Portland, Oregon.
  • With the exception of Powell Butte, the terrain on the north side of Johnson Creek is less steep than on the south side of the creek, which includes Mount Scott and the Boring Lava Domes.
  • Battle Ground Lake State Park is a park northeast of Vancouver, Washington, U.S., consisting of an ancient volcano in the Boring Lava Field where a magma-induced steam explosion made a large bean-shaped crater, a maar, which later filled with water, forming a crater lake.
  • The summit rises to an elevation of, It is part of the Boring Lava Field, a zone of ancient volcanic activity in the area around Portland, and was named for Harvey W. Scott, a 19th and 20th century editor of The Oregonian newspaper.
  • It is one of four such cones (the others being Rocky Butte, Kelly Butte and Mount Tabor) inside the city that are home to a city park and is part of the Boring Lava Field, an area of extinct volcanoes.
  • It is part of the Boring Lava Field, an extinct Plio-Pleistocene volcanic field that contains 32 cinder cones and shield volcanoes in or near Portland.
  • In the southeast, soils have a medium risk of erosion, and soils around Powell Butte and the Boring Lava Domes have "an extremely high erodibility factor and are sensitive to ground disturbance".
  • As the west-flowing waters rushed around Rocky Butte, a volcanic cinder cone in the Boring Lava Field, sediments were deposited on the west side of the butte forming an approximately 100 to high bar that became Alameda Ridge.
  • The Tabor cinder cone is part of the Boring Lava Field, an extensive network of cinder cones and small shield volcanoes ranging from Boring, Oregon to southwest Washington, and dating to the Plio-Pleistocene era.
  • The Boring Lava Field is an extinct Plio-Pleistocene volcanic field zone with at least 32 cinder cones and small shield volcanoes lying within a radius of 13 miles (21 km) of Kelly Butte, which is approximately 4 miles (6 km) east of downtown Portland, Oregon, in the United States.