bony scales

26 examples (0.02 sec)
  • One of the things that made them different from salamanders was that their skin was covered with bony scales.
  • Instead, in most species, it is largely replaced by solid, protective bony scales.
  • Unlike normal tube feet, these were covered in small bony scales, and therefore remain visible in fossils.
  • It was covered in large, round, bony scales, and probably fed on other fishes.
  • The overlying scales, except in very young animals, are always rubbed off, so that the bony scales are exposed.
  • The large, bony scales have small orange or red dots.
  • We are now on the edge of a lake abounding with fish, whose bony scales glitter in the water as they pursue their prey. Cited from Lectures on Popular and Scientific Subjects, by J. S. Sinclair
  • The bony scales of thelodonts, the most abundant form of fossil fish, are well understood.
  • The bony scales of the thelodont group, as the most abundant form of fossil, are also the best understood - and thus most useful.
  • The body of the lungfish is covered with large, bony scales.
  • The outer layer of the skin, consisting of small bony scales. Cited from People's Common Sense Medical Adviser in Plain English, by R.V. Pierce
  • Perhaps its most distinctive features are the rows of enlarged, bony scales down its back and muscular tail, giving the lizard its namesake.
  • However, they can be distinguished by a prominent silver stripe on either side of the body and lack of scutes (bony scales) along their bellies.
  • This is in evident allusion to its bony scales, in which it is protected as in a coat of mail. Cited from Voyages of Samuel de Champlain, Vol. 2,Champlain
  • Unlike modern amphibians, with their slimy skin, the Carboniferous amphibians wore an armor of bony scales over the ventral surface and sometimes over the back as well. Cited from The Elements of Geology, by W. H. Norton
  • The gars have thick ganoid scales typical of sturgeons whereas the bowfin has thin bony scales like the teleosts.
  • In passing from aquatic to terrestrial life the horny scales were further developed, and the bony scales degenerated in most of the reptiles. Cited from The Evolution of Man, V.2, by Ernst Haeckel
  • The body proper is but about nine inches, but, when stretched at length, he covers an extent of two and a half feet, from head to tail, and is wholly fortified with an impenetrable armor of bony scales. Cited from Journal of an African Cruiser, by Horatio Bridge
  • Though clad in a coat of thick, bony scales, a well-directed charge of buckshot from a gun, or a lead ball from a musket, will penetrate the body, notwithstanding all that has been said to the contrary. Cited from Four Months in a Sneak-Box, by N. Bishop
  • The fish had a flat head, round body, and the lower extremities covered with bony scales; its mouth was wholly without teeth, the pectoral fins, which were highly developed, sprouted direct from the body, which properly speaking had no tail. Cited from A Journey to the Centre of the Earth, by Jules Verne
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