bony palate

26 examples (0.02 sec)
  • The bony palate is short, with its posterior end often located between the third molars.
  • The bony palate ends at the level of the back of the third upper molars.
  • Secondary bony palates have been found in the more advanced cynodonts and have been used as evidence of high metabolic rates.
  • The bony palate itself is broad and lacks many indentations and protuberances present in other species.
  • Paleognathes are named for a characteristic, complex architecture of the bones in the bony palate.
  • The bony palate extended beyond the third molars.
  • They have also a well-developed bony palate, which in the Duplicidentata is imperfect, forming in fact but a narrow bridge from one jaw to the other. Cited from Natural History of the Mammalia of India and Ceylon, Robert A. Sterndale
  • Deinosuchus had a secondary bony palate, which would have permitted it to breathe through its nostrils while the rest of the head remained submerged underwater.
  • The bony palate is long and extends beyond the end of the molar row and the back margin of the maxillary bones.
  • Mammals have a secondary bony palate, which separates the respiratory passage from the mouth, allowing them to eat and breathe at the same time.
  • These fish, it seems, have strong bony palates and throat-teeth for crushing shells and crabs, and make this wonderful noise simply by grinding their teeth together. Cited from At Last, by Charles Kingsley
  • The bony palate is relatively short, with the mesopterygoid fossa extending forward to the end of the molar row or even between the third molars.
  • The mesopterygoid fossa, the openings behind the bony palate, is very narrow.
  • They can be distinguished based on appearance, because Townsend's vole has darker colorings, a relatively longer tail, and differences in the structure of the bony palate.
  • The bony palate is broad and short, with the posterior margin between the third molars (M3).
  • But some cold-blooded vertebrates have secondary bony palates (crocodilians and some lizards), while birds, which are warm-blooded, do not.
  • The incisive foramina (openings in the front part of the palate) are long and the bony palate itself is smooth.
  • The incisive foramina, openings in the bony palate, extend back to a point next to the front root of M1.
  • The skull with the bony palate is much produced backwards, but otherwise resembles that of Paradoxurus hermaphroditus.
  • Other shared characteristics include an essentially featureless bony palate, without many pits and ridges, and a broad mesopterygoid fossa (the opening behind the palate).
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