bony fishes

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  • This is a very large order that includes many of the bony fish in the ocean.
  • The brain of the ordinary bony fish is at a very low level. Cited from The Outline of Science, Vol. 1 (of 4), by J. Arthur Thomson
  • They are bony fish and their meat is not desirable, so most are released after they are caught.
  • This form of fetal development is common in bony fish, even though their eggs can be quite small.
  • This species has also been known to take bony fishes.
  • However, bony fish have a single gill opening on each side.
  • This species is certainly the largest bony fish ever and perhaps the largest non-cetacean marine animal to have ever existed.
  • Among the bony fishes, all our modern and familiar types appear. Cited from The Story of Evolution, by Joseph McCabe
  • In bony fish and tetrapods the external opening into the inner ear has been lost.
  • Catfish have one of the greatest ranges in size within a single order of bony fish.
  • Three distinct Ig heavy chains have so far been identified in bony fish.
  • Five potential sumoylation sites are also seen and conserved back to the bony fish.
  • Likewise, bony fish can release the ammonia into the water where it is quickly diluted.
  • "But tell me, are you familiar with the differences between bony fish and cartilaginous fish?" Cited from 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, Jules Verne
  • In bony fish, the intestine is relatively short, typically around one and a half times the length of the fish's body.
  • Off Australia, squid are the most important prey, followed by bony fish.
  • Analysis of ten coprolites showed that eight contained evidence of bony fish and crawfish.
  • Unlike other bony fishes, the first scales do not develop immediately after the larval stage but appear much later on.
  • The great majority of bony fish species have five pairs of gills, although a few have lost some over the course of evolution.
  • The heavy scale armour of the early bony fishes would certainly weigh the animals down.
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