blister steel

27 examples (0.03 sec)
  • During this time, carbon diffused into the iron, producing a product called cement steel or blister steel.
  • The raw material for this was blister steel, made by the cementation process.
  • The resulting crucible steel, usually cast in ingots, was more homogeneous than blister steel.
  • They were leading participants in the cartel in oregrounds iron, the raw material for blister steel.
  • Although Europeans had been making steel for nearly three centuries, the processes for creating blister steel and crucible steel were slow and extremely expensive.
  • Blister steel that has been faggoted was known as shear steel; if faggoted twice, as double shear steel.
  • Blister steel was made from wrought iron by packing wrought iron in charcoal and heating for several days.
  • The successful process was crucible steel, which was made by melting wrought iron and blister steel in a crucible.
  • In making crucible steel the blister steel bars were broken into pieces and melted in small crucibles each containing 20 kg or so.
  • This made it the best material for conversion to blister steel, the main variety of steel made in Great Britain between the 1610s and the 1850s.
  • Whilst in Handsworth, he developed the process whereby it became possible to melt down raw or "blister steel" and produce cast ingots of steel.
  • This would decrease its usefulness in making blister steel (cementation), where the speed and amount of carbon absorption is the overriding consideration.
  • It was classified as first oregrounds and at the height of its power most of the products were exported to England, where it was converted to blister steel by the cementation process.
  • Because the ancients could not produce temperatures high enough to melt iron fully, the production of steel in decent quantities did not occur until the introduction of blister steel during the Middle Ages.
  • Blister steel (made as above) was melted in a crucible or in a furnace, and cast (usually) into ingots.
  • The iron had "gained" a little over 1% in mass from the carbon in the charcoal, and had become heterogeneous bars of blister steel.
  • Finest puukkos have blades of Damascus steel, and forging a blade using blister steel was considered the hallmark of a master smith.
  • Although steel had been produced in bloomery furnaces for thousands of years, steel's use expanded extensively after more efficient production methods were devised in the 17th century for blister steel and then crucible steel.
  • In 1740, Benjamin Huntsman began melting blister steel in a crucible to even out the carbon content, creating the first process for the mass production of tool steel.
  • In the 1740s, Benjamin Huntsman found a means of melting blister steel, made by the cementation process, in crucibles.
  • Next »