blister agents

20 examples (0.02 sec)
  • The patient is kept quiet and in the course of two weeks an active blistering agent is employed over the region affected. Cited from Lameness of the Horse, by John Victor Lacroix
  • Blister agents, including CR gas, are less often used riot control agents.
  • All blister agents currently known are heavier than air, and are readily absorbed through the eyes, lungs, and skin.
  • Mustard is a blistering agent that works to destroy different substances with cells of living tissue.
  • A blister agent is a chemical compound that irritates and causes injury to the skin.
  • During the third Quarter Quell, Mags was killed by a mysterious blister agent.
  • While initial tests suggested that the rounds contained a blister agent, subsequent analysis by American and Danish experts showed that no chemical agent was present.
  • Occasionally, phosgene oxime is included among the blister agents, although it is more properly termed a nettle agent.
  • The battle consisted of extensive use of poison gas by both sides, including the newly introduced German Yellow Cross shell containing the blistering agent sulfur mustard.
  • The 3 fatalities had burns and white spots on their bodies, leading experts to believe a mustard gas or another blister agent was used.
  • Due to PD being easily recognized in the field and a relatively fast rate for decontamination procedures to become effective, the chemical is not as useful as other blister agents.
  • One component of CIDAS is an applicator that is used to show chemical agents, specifically nerve and blister agents.
  • A blister agent, or vesicant, is a chemical compound that causes severe skin, eye and mucosal pain and irritation.
  • Some chemical warfare agents, known as blister agents or vesicants, cause large, painful blisters wherever they contact skin; an example is mustard gas.
  • It is a poisonous substance, acting as a blister agent, and can cause severe chemical burns, but these same properties make it effective as a topical medication.
  • From the new Yellow Cross shells containing the blistering agent sulfur mustard were fired in addition to an undetermined number of shells containing diphosgene.
  • Although its use is banned by the FDA in the United States in its pure, undiluted form, the topical blistering agent cantharidin can be effective.
  • Chemical weapons include blister agents that were designed to inflict chemical burns or blister the skin, and nerve agents that were designed to impair the nervous system.
  • The Japanese used mustard gas and the blister agent Lewisite, against Chinese troops and guerillas in China, amongst others during the Changde chemical weapon attack.
  • Thiodiglycol is a Chemical Weapons Convention schedule 2 chemical used in the production of sulfur-based blister agents such as mustard gas.