beget an

21 examples (0.03 sec)
  • It was now his first duty in life to beget an heir, and for that purpose a wife must be had. Cited from Mr. Scarborough's Family, by Anthony Trollope
  • The longer stay in school actually begets an increase of failures. Cited from The High School Failures, by Francis P. Obrien
  • If, however, the youth refuses to beget an heir it will be the end also of truth and beauty.
  • It at least begot an interest in the fate of each other; and an interest so called is never very widely separated from affection. Cited from Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, Vol. XXIII., by Various
  • A human being and ape can not beget an ape-human, showing that they are not even nearly related species. Cited from Evolution Of Man Scientifically Disproved,Williams
  • The king tells them that he has decided that the Queen will continue to try and beget an heir, but only with another subordinate.
  • Therefore the generating power of a plant generates a plant, and that of an animal begets an animal. Cited from Summa Theologica, Part I (Prima Pars), by Thomas Aquinas
  • And now let some of you lament that hour wherein the devil's son begot an heir for England! Cited from Chivalry, by James Branch Cabell
  • Prayer begets an awakened desire to be and do good. Cited from No and Yes, by Mary Baker Eddy
  • If a man beget an hundred children, and live many years, and his soul be not filled with good, I say that an untimely birth is better than he. Cited from Gala-Days, by Gail Hamilton (Abigail Dodge)
  • In these, the mere coming aboard seemed to beget an aggressively confidential mood. Cited from Entire PG Edition of William Dean Howells
  • All mystery causes a certain disquietude, but if the problem seems to us capable of being solved, it begets an agreeable curiosity. Cited from History of English Humour, Vol. 2 (of 2),by Alfred Guy Kingan L'Estrange
  • A number of States may constitute themselves into a family, but this confederation, as an individuality, must create an opposition and so beget an enemy. Cited from German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VII
  • And even where this force of excitement is wanting, a gentle impulse of feeling may suffice to beget an assurance of a distant reality. Cited from Illusions, by James Sully
  • And wherefore doth he thus, but to beget an expectation in them of their salvation and deliverance? Cited from The Riches of Bunyan, by Rev. Jeremiah Chaplin
  • For example, if the government decides to expand the Medicaid program an individual may experience an increase in enabling resources, which in turn may beget an increase in health services usage.
  • Their discussion begot an interest in the kindred type of the ballad, which may be regarded as a miniature epic in a lyrical form. Cited from The Life and Works of Friedrich Schiller,C. Thomas
  • Until, say they who know the thing, Their very lips did kiss, And Sorrow laid abed with Spring Begat an earthly bliss. Cited from Poems By The Way & Love Is Enough, by William Morris
  • When the effects wear off, proportionate lassitude follows, which begets an insatiate and insane craving for the drug. Cited from Searchlights on Health, by B. G. Jefferis and J. L. Nichols
  • Sir John advanced toward her with as much elegance as he might muster; for gout when coupled with such excessive bulk does not beget an overpowering amount of grace. Cited from The Line of Love, by James Branch Cabell