befit him

20 examples (0.03 sec)
  • On the other hand the other virtues perfect man in those matters only which befit him in relation to himself. Cited from Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae), by Thomas Aquinas
  • Then he might have remained in the obscurity which befits him. Cited from Cleopatra, by Georg Ebers, v1
  • Was it not possible that as easy an exodus might befit Him? Cited from How to Become Like Christ, by Marcus Dods
  • Besides, he himself was a very gallant man indeed, and it befitted him to take the post of danger before the eyes of all these foreigners. Cited from Active Service, by Stephen Crane
  • His face went almost white, and then his head came up as befitted him in whose veins flowed the blood of the overlord of a world. Cited from Thuvia, Maid of Mars, Edgar Rice Burroughs
  • I protested against taking this seat, which so much more befitted him than I, but the Doctor would not yield: I must take it. Cited from How I Found Livingstone, by Sir Henry M. Stanley
  • In order to know whether what a man does befits him as a man to do, the first thing to examine is that which he mainly desires and wills in his action. Cited from Moral Philosophy, by Joseph Rickaby, S. J
  • The lonely lamp, the niche, the dark cathedral grove, befit him best. Cited from Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Vol. I, by Margaret Fuller Ossoli
  • A sad or a culprit air did not befit him: one reckoned up his foibles and errors when seeing him under a partly beaten aspect. Cited from Adventures Harry Richmond by Meredith, v6
  • When Sir Bloedel heard the guerdon, and that the lady through her beauty would befit him well, he weened to serve the lovely queen in strife. Cited from The Nibelungenlied
  • In this respect, God's justice regards what befits Him; inasmuch as He renders to Himself what is due to Himself. Cited from Summa Theologica, Part I (Prima Pars), by Thomas Aquinas
  • In this play the dramatist has recovered his sense of harmony: he places his central figure in circumstances that befit him, and maintains a consistent balance between the strength of his character and the nature of his deeds. Cited from The Growth of English Drama, by Arnold Wynne
  • When now she would forego her hate of Gunther, so that he might kiss her, it had befitted him better had she not been wronged by his advice; then might he have gone boldly unto Kriemhild. Cited from The Nibelungenlied
  • He stands a little apart from the rest of Spanish poets in a splendid solitude which befits him; he must perforce be solitary, dwelling as he most often does at altitudes inaccessible to ordinary mortals. Cited from Fray Luis de Leo'n, by James Fitzmaurice-Kelly
  • Hence whatever befits God, pertains to His goodness, and whatever does not befit Him, is far removed from the perfection of goodness which is His Essence. Cited from Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae), by Thomas Aquinas
  • It is the revelation, first of all, of Christ's singular calmness and majestic leisure, which befitted Him who needed not to hurry, because He was conscious of absolute power. Cited from Expositions/Holy Scripture: John 1-14, Maclaren
  • The delicate phrases and expressions employed by persons of politeness assume a knowledge which children ought not to possess, and they are quite out of place with them, but when we truly respect the child's innocence we easily find in talking to him the simple phrases which befit him. Cited from Emile, by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • Now the very thing which befits a man in respect of a vicious habit, is something that excludes a spiritual good: the result being that a man chooses a spiritual evil, that he may obtain possession of what befits him in respect of that habit: and this is to sin through certain malice. Cited from Summa Theologica, Part I-II (Pars Prima Secundae), Saint Thomas Aquinas
  • Flute, when he complains that it would hardly befit him to play a woman's part because he had a beard coming, is bidden by his resourceful manager, Quince, play Thisbe in a "mask." Cited from Shakespeare and the Modern Stage, by Sir Sidney Lee
  • Lastly came Doctor Holzschuher of the council, my grand- uncle's notary, and one of our own father's most trusted friends, in all points a man of such worth and honesty that no words befit him so well as the Cardinal's saying: that he reminded him of an oak of the German forests. Cited from Margery, by Georg Ebers, v7