Basin pocket mice

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  • Great Basin pocket mice do not use free water, they metabolize water from food.
  • In nature, Great Basin pocket mice remain reproductively active through fall in years of favorable plant production.
  • Great Basin pocket mice are fairly successful at finding buried seed caches, even those buried by other individuals.
  • Great Basin pocket mice remain reproductively active through summer.
  • Great Basin pocket mice consume primarily seeds, but eat some green vegetation.
  • In late fall and winter, Great Basin pocket mice remain in their burrows in a state of torpor.
  • Riparian zones may have larger concentrations of Great Basin pocket mice than upland areas.
  • A number of small mammals including the Great Basin pocket mouse and sagebrush voles are found in the park as well.
  • Great Basin pocket mice are nocturnal and use burrows for daytime cover.
  • In the laboratory, an artificial short day-long night summer photoperiod caused gonadal shrinkage in Great Basin pocket mice.
  • To conserve energy when food is scarce in summer, Great Basin pocket mice often enter a state of torpor that lasts a few hours.
  • The Great Basin pocket mouse occurs in the Columbia River Basin and the Great Basin and adjacent lands.
  • In productive years, cheatgrass seeds formed a major portion of the diet of Great Basin pocket mice in southeastern Washington.
  • Captive female Great Basin pocket mice from eastern Washington fed lettuce and seeds had significantly larger ovaries than control females fed only seeds.
  • Estimated seed intake of a Great Basin pocket mouse is from 4% to 10% of total body weight daily.
  • Great Basin pocket mice occupy open, arid terrain.
  • The Great Basin pocket mouse occupies steppes and open, arid shrublands and woodlands.
  • Rodents common to the area include western gray squirrel, golden-mantled ground squirrel, least chipmunk, western harvest mouse, Great Basin pocket mouse, and northern grasshopper mouse.
  • Mice species include Great Basin pocket mouse, northern grasshopper mouse, western harvest mouse, deer mouse, meadow mouse, and creeping vole.
  • The Great Basin pocket mouse (Perognathus parvus) is a species of rodent in the family Heteromyidae.

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