Basin of Minas

24 examples (0.02 sec)
  • It was the entrance to the Basin of Minas that lay before him. Cited from Lost in the Fog, by James De Mille
  • The latter ran regularly up to the Basin of Minas from St. John. Cited from Lost in the Fog, by James De Mille
  • "But if we don't, will we drift back again into the Basin of Minas?" Cited from Lost in the Fog, by James De Mille
  • Only five transports lay in the basin of Minas. Cited from The Acadian Exiles, by Arthur G. Doughty
  • The only settled agricultural population was at Port Royal, Beaubassin, and the Basin of Minas. Cited from Count Frontenac, by Francis Parkman
  • THE GASPEREAU is a river that flows into the Basin of Minas, east of Grand Pre. Cited from Evangeline, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • And the pond which was left was the Basin of Minas. Cited from Algonquin Legends of New England, C. G. Leland
  • We should also pass through those meadows on the Basin of Minas which Mr. Longfellow has made more sadly poetical than any other spot on the Western Continent. Cited from The Complete Writings of Charles Dudley Warner V1
  • "Pleasantly gleams in the soft, sweet air the Basin of Minas." Cited from Over the Border: Acadia, by Eliza Chase
  • Pleasantly gleamed in the soft, sweet air the Basin of Minas, Where the ships, with their wavering shadows, were riding at anchor. Cited from Evangeline, by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
  • Beyond is the Basin of Minas, with its sedgy shore, its dreary flats; and beyond that projects a bold headland, standing perpendicular against the sky. Cited from The Complete Writings of Charles Dudley Warner V1
  • Gaspereau (gas-per-o'), a river in King's county, Nova Scotia, flowing into the Basin of Minas. Cited from Elson Grammer School Literature, by Elson, Book 4
  • Reckless with homesickness, they had stolen away, and made a bold push for the sea, in the vain hope that on it they might float back to the Basin of Minas. Cited from The Bay State Monthly - Volume 1, Issue 4 - April, 1884, by Various
  • Slightly picturesque this valley is with its winding river and high hills guarding it, and perhaps a person would enjoy a foot-tramp down it; but, I think he would find little peculiar or interesting after he left the neighborhood of the Basin of Minas. Cited from The Complete Writings of Charles Dudley Warner V1
  • The approach of the white man causing the Indian giant to desert his old haunts, he sailed out on the great water and vanished from sight; but some day, when men and animals live together in peace and friendship, he will return and resume his royal sway on the Basin of Minas. Cited from Over the Border: Acadia, by Eliza Chase
  • The lands of their fathers in their old haunts on the Basin of Minas were in possession of people from New England; and, having a natural and inherited affection for localities by the sea, they wandered down the coast and scattered along shore as we find them now. Cited from Over the Border: Acadia, by Eliza Chase
  • IN the Acadian land, on the shores of the Basin of Minas, Distant, secluded, still, the little village of Grand-Pre Lay in the fruitful valley. Cited from Evangeline, by Henry W. Longfellow
  • In the Acadian land, on the shores of the Basin of Minas, Distant, secluded, still, the little village of Grand-Pre Lay in the fruitful valley. Cited from An English Grammar, by W. M. Baskervill and J. W. Sewell
  • Being long, narrow, and running into the land like a tunnel, the tide rises higher and higher as it ascends into the upper and narrowest parts; thus in the eastern arm, the Basin of Minas, the tidal swell rises forty feet, sometimes fifty or more in spring. Cited from Over the Border: Acadia, by Eliza Chase
  • The settlers on the Basin of Minas were immigrants from Saintonge, Poitou, and La Rochelle, who came to this country in the early part of the seventeenth century. Cited from Over the Border: Acadia, by Eliza Chase
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