Basin Bristlecone

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  • A grove of ancient Great Basin Bristlecone Pines grows on this plateau near the peak.
  • Higher up on the glacial moraine is a grove of ancient Great Basin Bristlecone Pines of great age.
  • Although named after the Limber Pine, the range might better be known for its large and vigorous stand of Great Basin Bristlecone Pines.
  • The oldest known tree is a Great Basin bristlecone pine, Pinus longaeva, growing in the White Mountains of eastern California.
  • The justification for this being that no subpopulations for Great Basin bristlecone pines are decreasing.
  • The current record-holders for individual, non-clonal trees are the Great Basin bristlecone pine trees from California and Nevada, in the United States.
  • The ancient Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) trees are found in Great Basin montane forests.
  • It is a Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) called Methuselah growing in the White Mountains.
  • Immediately to the north is a large flat sub-alpine area called The Table, which supports an ancient stand of Great Basin Bristlecone Pine (Pinus longaeva).
  • Methuselah is a -year-old Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) tree growing high in the White Mountains of Inyo County in eastern California.
  • The oldest non-clonal organism ever discovered, a Great Basin Bristlecone Pine tree at least 5000 years old, grew at the treeline near Wheeler Peak in the National Park.
  • Stands of limber pine and Great Basin bristlecone pine (Pinus longaeva) can be found in some of the higher ranges (the Methuselah tree is nearly 5000 years old).
  • Several large groves of ancient Great Basin Bristlecone Pine (Pinus longaeva) trees thrive in the Great Basin montane forests of the range's higher elevations.
  • P. balfouriana is closely related to the bristlecone pines, being classified in the same subsection Balfourianae; it has been hybridised with the Great Basin Bristlecone Pine in cultivation, though no hybrids have ever been found in the wild.
  • Bristlecone pines in the White Mountains of California and elsewhere were discovered to be older than any species yet dated, and in 1963 Currey became aware of a Great Basin Bristlecone Pine population in the Snake Range and on Wheeler Peak in particular.
  • It is neither the tallest extant species of tree (that distinction belongs to the coast redwood), nor is it the widest (that distinction belongs to the baobab tree), nor is it the longest-lived (that distinction belongs to the Great Basin bristlecone pine).
  • Prometheus (recorded as WPN-114) was the oldest known non-clonal organism, a Great Basin Bristlecone Pine (Pinus longaeva) tree growing near the tree line on Wheeler Peak in eastern Nevada, United States.
  • Ecologically, the White Mountains are like the other ranges in the Basin and Range Province; they are dry, but the upper slopes from hold open subalpine forests of Great Basin Bristlecone Pine on permeable dolomite and certain granite substrates and Limber pine on less permeable rocky substrates.
  • A variety of trees can be found on the mountain, including Single-leaf Pinyon (Pinus monophylla), Limber Pine (Pinus flexilis), and, at the highest elevations, the ancient Great Basin Bristlecone Pine (Pinus longaeva).
  • The White Pine Range Wilderness is characterized by rocky canyons and forested alpine hills covered with Abies concolor - white fir, Pinus monophylla - Single-leaf Pinyon, Pinus flexilis - Limber pine, and Pinus longaeva - Great Basin Bristlecone Pines.

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