bailout loan

20 examples (0.04 sec)
  • Looking further ahead, it was generally expected Cyprus would need to apply for an additional bailout loan.
  • The interest for the eurozone loans is 5%, considered to be a rather high level for any bailout loan.
  • The potential third bailout loan is expected to be finally considered by European Union policy makers in May or June 2014.
  • If the report finds, that Greece did not deliver any progress on the agreed path outlined in the bailout plan, the second bailout loan will most likely get cancelled.
  • According to the Portuguese finance minister, the average interest rate on the bailout loan is expected to be 5.1 percent.
  • In practical terms this caused the private capital market to freeze, so that all the Greek financial needs instead had to be covered by international bailout loans, in order to avoid a sovereign default.
  • The offered orderly default and bailout loan, was however conditional, that Greece at the same time approved a new austerity package.
  • The subsequent bailout loans paid to Greece were mainly used to pay for the maturing bonds, but also to finance the continued yearly budget deficits.
  • However, after each country agreed to IMF bailout loans, foreign investors immediately withdrew their money, leaving the tax payers with enormous debts and triggering massive economic disasters.
  • Thus, bailed out CEOs mad significantly more than bank CEOs not accepting the FDIC's bailout loan guarantees.
  • In August 2012, Citizens had not repaid its $300 million bailout loan from the US Treasury.
  • When the time came for the bailout loan to be formally approved by the Board of the IMF, it however became clear that the Icesave dispute also first needed to be resolved, before the bailout loan could be transferred.
  • Lynam is widely credited with breaking the news that Ireland was in talks with the IMF and EU to get a bailout loan in November 2010.
  • If the report finds, that significant real implementation progress was achieved, but that certain unforeseen factors justify a prolonged deadline for Greece to restore its fiscal balance, a revision of the second bailout loan will most probably be granted.
  • India asked for a $1.8 billion bailout loan from the International Monetary Fund (IMF), which in return demanded de-regulation.
  • In 2006, it was saved from impending insolvency by a $2 million bailout loan from the city of San Jose; this was later restructured into a long-term loan similar to a mortgage.
  • All new bailouts for any eurozone member state will now be covered by ESM, while the EFSF and EFSM will continue to handle money transfers and program monitoring for the previously approved bailout loans to Ireland, Portugal and Greece.
  • In February 2009 the Latvian government asked the International Monetary Fund and the European Union for an emergency bailout loan of 7.5 billion Euros, while at the same time the government nationalized Parex Bank, the country's second largest bank.
  • In July 2011 European leaders agreed to cut the interest rate that Ireland was paying on its EU/IMF bailout loan from around 6% to between 3.5% and 4% and to double the loan time to 15 years.
  • On 2 May 2010, the Eurozone countries and the International Monetary Fund (IMF) agreed on a bailout loan for Greece, conditional on compliance with the following three key points: The payment of the bailout was scheduled to happen in several disbursements from May 2010 until June 2013.