bailout gas

19 examples (0.02 sec)
  • This may be considered a relatively minor problem if the requirement for bailout gas is considered.
  • This procedure would save the bailout gas which would then be available if the situation deteriorates further.
  • This will result in the bailout gas being used up if the valve leaks.
  • The bailout gas is not intended for use during the dive except in an emergency.
  • Bailout gas may be carried in a variety of ways in a bailout cylinder.
  • There should be sufficient gas to enable the diver to reach a place of safety on the bailout gas in an emergency.
  • If on the other hand, bailout pressure is higher than main supply pressure, the bailout gas will overrride the main gas supply if the valve is opened.
  • Each diver carries back mounted bailout gas, which should be sufficient to allow a safe return to the bell in the event of an umbilical gas supply failure.
  • Most recreational divers rely on their buddy for bailout gas, and do not carry a redundant gas supply.
  • This feature makes it possible to use bailout gas supplies by a dive buddy with a standard regulator with the supermask.
  • The bailout gas volume carried by the diver is usually required to be sufficient to return to a place of safety where more gas is available, such as the surface, diving stage or wet or dry bell.
  • When the diver needs to switch over to bailout gas he simply opens the bailout valve and the gas is supplied to the helmet or mask.
  • Bell diving bailout options: For bell dives there is no requirement for decompression gas, as the bell itself carries bailout gas.
  • Bailout gas is carried by the diver in a scuba cylinder, usually mounted on the back of the harness in the same position as is used with recreational scuba.
  • A general rule of gas usage in this range is that the "bailout gas should match existing breathing gas" so that the switch made between cylinders does not influence calculations for present or future decompression allowances.
  • Bailout supply pressure options: If the interstage pressure for the bailout regulator is lower than the main supply pressure, the main supply will override the bailout gas, and continue to flow.
  • The bailout gas from the back mounted cylinder passes through a conventional scuba first stage at the cylinder valve, to the bailout block, where it is normally isolated by the bailout valve.
  • The bailout gas supply may be from the rebreather diluent cylinder, from independent cylinders, or in the case of depths less than about 6m, from the rebreather oxygen cylinder.
  • The full face mask does not usually have a bailout block fitted, and this is usually attached to the diver's harness, with a single hose to supply the mask from main or bailout gas which is selected at the block.