backward induction

49 examples (0.04 sec)
  • Info Backward induction is the process of reasoning backwards in time, from the end of a problem or situation, to determine a sequence of optimal actions. more...
  • Backward induction has been used to solve games as long as the field of game theory has existed.
  • In game theory at large, this method is called backward induction.
  • Of course, this process of backward induction holds all the way back to the first competitor.
  • Here the prisoner reasons by backward induction, but seems to come to a false conclusion.
  • A counter-example was found where such a stable equilibrium did not satisfy backward induction.
  • Note, however, that the description of the problem assumes it is possible to surprise someone who is performing backward induction.
  • The mathematical theory of backward induction does not make this assumption, so the paradox does not call into question the results of this theory.
  • The standard solution to the centipede game is determined by backward induction.
  • Backward induction assumes that all future play will be rational.
  • They conclude that chess players are familiar with using backward induction reasoning and hence need less learning to reach the equilibrium.
  • The value of any quantity of capital at any previous time can be calculated by backward induction using the Bellman equation.
  • Sequential games with perfect information are often solved by backward induction.
  • The following proof by cases relies directly on well-known rules of arithmetic but employs the rarely used technique of forward-backward-induction.
  • However, backward induction cannot be applied to games of imperfect or incomplete information because this entails cutting through non-singleton information sets.
  • In game theory, its application to (simpler) subgames in order to find a solution to the game is called backward induction.
  • In particular since completely mixed Nash equilibrium are sequential - such equilibria when they exist satisfy both forward and backward induction.
  • Forward induction is so called because just as backward induction assumes future play will be rational, forward induction assumes past play was rational.
  • Backward induction can only be used in terminating (finite) games of definite length and cannot be applied to games with imperfect information.
  • The algorithm (which is generally called backward induction or retrograde analysis) can be described recursively as follows.
  • Backward induction posits that a player's optimal action now anticipates the optimality of his and others' future actions.
  • Next »