axon can

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  • There are four different ways an axon can take before reaching its terminal.
  • Over time, the time it takes an action potential to propagate down the length of a particular axon can change.
  • Axons can be distinguished from dendrites by several features including shape, length, and function.
  • Some axons can extend up to one meter or more while others extend as little as one millimeter.
  • In humans, these axons can be as long as one meter.
  • Since an axon can be unmyelinated or myelinated, the action potential has two methods to travel down the axon.
  • In addition, pioneer axons can act as guidepost cells to more distant pioneer neurons.
  • Anatomical connectivity of a mitral cell axon can be quite different depending on the target structure.
  • Single action potentials from unmyelinated axons can be observed.
  • The flow of currents within an axon can be described quantitatively by cable theory and its elaborations, such as the compartmental model.
  • The ventral midline of the central nervous system is a key place where axons can either decide to cross and laterally project or stay on the same side of the brain.
  • Follower axons can still extend along the longitudinal pathways, however, their selective fasciculation routes are altered.
  • Law of dynamic polarization Although the axon can conduct in both directions, in tissue there is a preferred direction for transmission from cell to cell.
  • The Lugaro cell axon can sometimes take a curving detour through the granular layer, before running its parallel course in the molecular layer.
  • However, only the unfired part of the axon can respond with an action potential; the part that has just fired is unresponsive until the action potential is safely out of range and cannot restimulate that part.
  • In glia ablation experiments, follower axons can misroute away from their wild-type longitudinal pathways and along the intersegmental nerve.
  • In the peripheral nervous system (PNS) axons can be either myelinated or unmyelinated.
  • Several recent studies have reported that preventing OEG inhibition will present a uniform population of cells in the spinal cord, creating an environment in which damaged axons can be repaired.
  • Successful axons can therefore reconnect with the muscles or organs they previously controlled with the help of Schwann cells, however, specificity is not maintained and errors are frequent, especially when long distances are involved.
  • If the ion pumps are turned off by removing their energy source, or by adding an inhibitor such as ouabain, the axon can still fire hundreds of thousands of action potentials before their amplitudes begin to decay significantly.