aureus infections

20 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Fusidic acid should not be used on its own to treat S. aureus infections when used at low drug dosages.
  • The number of reported S. aureus infections was 25 times as high as in hospitalized patients, a high-risk group.
  • CA-MRSA infections now appear endemic in many urban regions and cause most CA-S. aureus infections.
  • It emerged later that there was clear evidence of a Staphylococcus aureus infection that had spread as far as the child's cerebrospinal fluid.
  • Deeply penetrating S. aureus infections can be severe.
  • Any S. aureus infection can cause the staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome, a cutaneous reaction to exotoxin absorbed into the bloodstream.
  • In 1974 2% of hospital-acquired S. aureus infections could be attributed to MRSA.
  • Animal and in vitro studies have also suggested that helenalin can reduce the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and reduce the severity of S. aureus infection.
  • These findings open the way to a biological control therapy to help in the treatment of S. aureus infections which are becoming a growing threat due to the rise of resistance to conventional antibiotic treatments.
  • Half of all S. aureus infections in the US are resistant to penicillin, methicillin, tetracycline and erythromycin.
  • Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) is one of many toxins associated with S. aureus infection.
  • By 2004 MRSA accounted for 64% of hospital-acquired S. aureus infections in the United States.
  • In 1959 methicillin was licensed in England to treat penicillin-resistant S. aureus infections.
  • Between 1968-mid-1990s the percent of S. aureus infections that were caused by MRSA increased steadily, and MRSA became recognized as an endemic pathogen.
  • Cefalexin does not treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.
  • VLDL and LDL interfere with the quorum sensing system that upregulates genes required for invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection.
  • S. aureus infections can spread through contact with pus from an infected wound, skin-to-skin contact with an infected person by producing hyaluronidase that destroys tissues, and contact with objects such as towels, sheets, clothing, or athletic equipment used by an infected person.
  • However, most serious S. aureus infections in the community, and many in hospitals, are caused by methicillin-susceptible isolates (MSSA) and there have been few attempts to identify the hypervirulent MSSA clones associated with serious disease.
  • The rate had increased to 22% by 1995, and by 1997 the percent of hospital S. aureus infections attributable to MRSA had reached 50%.
  • Differential diagnoses, other conditions that could cause similar symptoms as pneumatocele, include lung cancer, tuberculosis, and a lung abscess in the setting of Hyper IgE syndrome (aka Job's syndrome) or on its own, often caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection during cystic fibrosis.