Attic vases

34 examples (0.03 sec)
  • A double-scored shoulder line became a characteristic of Attic vases.
  • It is not always easy to distinguish these works from Attic vases.
  • Among black-figure Attic vases, the Panathenaic prize amphoras play a special role.
  • The first known erotic images on Attic vases are also found at this vase location.
  • It is sometimes copied in black-figure Attic vases, less often in red-figured vases.
  • Eucharides Painter is the common nickname of an ancient Greek artist who decorated but did not sign attic vases.
  • Recently, one of his attic vases was claimed to be looted and was repossessed by the Italian State.
  • Only Etruria, one of the main export markets for Attic vases, developed its own schools and workshops, eventually exporting its own products.
  • Similar depictions of wrestling techniques are found on Attic vases dating to Classical Greece.
  • The Etruscan predecessors were black-painted, whereas the Attic vases were decorated in the black-figure style.
  • In contrast to Attic vases, inscriptions are rare, and painters' signatures even more so.
  • The scene, therefore is the Judgement of Paris, which first appeared on Attic vases around 575 bc.
  • The Kleophon Painter was known for his paintings of various Red Figure Attic vases during the fifth century BCE.
  • After the Attic vases, the South Italian ones (including those from Sicily), are the most thoroughly researched.
  • Soon, local craftsmen were trained and the thematic and formal dependence on Attic vases overcome.
  • Often, Attic vases of low quality are mistaken as Boeotian.
  • The discovery of Attic vases with red figures testifies to the city's commercial contacts with Greece and the Greek colonies of Southern Italy.
  • Based on such information an approximate chronology can be drawn up using stylistic comparisons, but it seldom has anywhere near the precision of the dating of Attic vases.
  • A second room is dedicated to ancient Greece, containing a series of Attic vases in black-figure or red-figure, bronzes and terracotta Tanagra figurines.
  • The name was introduced in 1911 by John Beazley, a classical historian at the University of Oxford who had a special interest in attic vases.
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