Attic pottery

27 examples (0.04 sec)
  • Most Attic pottery was then painted in the black-figure style.
  • They are by far most frequently found on Attic pottery.
  • Attic pottery is a major source for modern scholars attempting to understand the institution of pederasty.
  • They feature the first conical cup bases in Attic pottery.
  • It is a kylix, a particularly successful example of Type B of the more than a hundred forms of Attic pottery cups.
  • The outstanding significance of Attic pottery comes from their almost endless repertoire of scenes covering a wide range of themes.
  • It is difficult to definitely recognise his work, since he was the centre and main artist of a highly productive Attic pottery workshop.
  • From about 825 BC onwards, an increased influence of Attic pottery is notable.
  • Since Attic pottery contains no glazes proper (i.e. ones that melt and vitrify completely), vessels could touch in the kiln.
  • The only other representations of the female nude at this period (c. 460) are on Attic pottery.
  • From about the beginning of the 5th century BC again under Greek influence, with imports of Attic pottery, figurative decoration was added.
  • This put the Corinthian craftsmen in competition with Attic pottery painters, who had in the meantime taken over a leading role in the pottery trade.
  • The import of luxurious Attic pottery in Pistiros was interrupted about the mid 3rd century BC.
  • Most of the extant Attic pottery has been recovered as grave goods (excavated or looted) from Etruscan tombs.
  • Symposiums often featured on Attic pottery and Richard Neer has argued that the chief function of Attic pottery was for use in the symposium.
  • He supervised partially John Beazley and Alan Blakeway and they published joint papers on black-figured Attic pottery excavated at Naucratis.
  • On Attic pottery, especially from the late fifth century, Heracles is depicted sitting in bliss in the Gardens of the Hesperides, attended by the maidens.
  • At the time of their production, Kerch style vases were exported to all of the Mediterranean region, but unlike earlier phases, the Black Sea area was the main market for this late phase of Attic pottery export.
  • Attic pottery was valued in the sanctuaries of the Etruscans, where they had additional roles: cultic ritual, banqueting and votive offerings.
  • Attic pottery was exported to Magna Graecia and even Etruria.
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