Attic orators

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  • Info The ten Attic orators were considered the greatest orators and logographers of the classical era (5th-4th century BCE).
  • Cicero, who heard him, puts him almost on a level with the Attic orators.
  • Nearly all those men who are either considered Attic orators or who speak in the Attic manner have avoided these faults. Cited from The Orations of Marcus Tullius Cicero, Volume 4, by Cicero
  • Demetrius was the last among the Attic orators worthy of the name, after which the activity went into a decline.
  • "Inspired by Eros, the boy speaks as if he had been all his life studying under an Attic orator!" Cited from An Egyptian Princess, by Georg Ebers, v4
  • He directed his attention especially to the Attic orators, and learnt all the orations of Demosthenes by heart.
  • There were ten Attic orators, whose works were collected by the Greek grammarians, and many of whose orations have come down to us. Cited from A Smaller History of Greece, by William Smith
  • To prove his point he explains that he has translated a debate between the two best Attic orators, Aeschines and Demosthenes.
  • His book, The Documents in the Attic Orators, includes an introduction to stichometry.
  • Against Eratosthenes is a speech by Lysias, one of the ten Attic orators.
  • More than this; for the first time an Attic orator has deliberately set to work to create a new type of prose, based on a cadence and rhythm. Cited from Authors of Greece, by T. W. Lumb
  • Aeschines was a Greek statesman and one of the ten Attic orators.
  • The Attic orators make numerous references to this.
  • The work of the Attic orators inspired the later rhetorical movement of Atticism, an approach to speech composition emphasizing a simple rather than ornate style.
  • For although they do not quite keep to the real form of oratory and to the principles of the Attic orators, still they make amends for this fault by their ability and fluency. Cited from The Orations of Marcus Tullius Cicero, Volume 4, by Cicero
  • And it is such as flourished at Athens; and in which the genius of the Attic orators is hardly comprehended by us, though their glory is known to us. Cited from The Orations of Marcus Tullius Cicero, Volume 4, by Cicero
  • But to speak with dignity and elegance and copiousness is a characteristic of Attic orators. Cited from The Orations of Marcus Tullius Cicero, Volume 4, by Cicero
  • Dinarchus, who is the least important of the Attic orators, survived Demosthenes, and was a friend of Demetrius Phalereus. Cited from A Smaller History of Greece, by William Smith
  • For I have translated the most illustrious orations of the two most eloquent of the Attic orators, spoken in opposition to one another: Aeschines and Demosthenes. Cited from The Orations of Marcus Tullius Cicero, Volume 4, by Cicero
  • I therefore flatter myself that it will not be foreign to my purpose, to instruct those who have a laudable emulation, but are not thoroughly settled in their judgment, wherein the merit of an Attic Orator consists. Cited from Cicero's Brutus or History of Famous Orators
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