attainder

All Noun
1,047 examples (0.02 sec)
  • Info In English criminal law, attainder or attinctura was the metaphorical "stain" or "corruption of blood" which arose from being condemned for a serious capital crime (felony or treason). more...
  • As she gave this information, she hoped that no attainder would fall upon her husband. Cited from The Scottish Chiefs, by Miss Jane Porter
  • Were there no goods and no attainder, I would still do this thing. Cited from Giles Corey, Yeoman, by Mary E. Wilkins Freeman
  • Up to this time they could not have known that any attainder act had been brought in in Ireland. Cited from Thomas Davis, Selections from his Prose and Poetry, by Thomas Davis
  • An act of attainder produces much less suffering than a civil war. Cited from Critical and Historical Essays, by Macaulay V1
  • So called because it passed attainders on the duke of York and his chief supporters. Cited from Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1, by Brewer
  • Parliament made acts of attainder one day, and reversed them almost on the next. Cited from An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800, by Cusack
  • What then was the meaning and use of acts of attainder? Cited from Henry VIII, by A. F. Pollard
  • His name was inserted in the act of attainder passed the same month.
  • Only his family's intervention and his father's money saved him from attainder.
  • Can it be said, that congress may pass a bill of attainder for the district of Columbia?
  • As a result of his father's attainder, he went into exile.
  • An act of attainder passed against him this session of parliament. Cited from The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol. I, Part C, by David Hume
  • Nor was much information of that sort given to or asked by parliament itself, previous to bills of attainder. Cited from Historic Doubts on the Life and Reign of King Richard the Third, Walpole
  • A bill of attainder is a law by which a person is immediately convicted without trial.
  • No attainder shall work corruption of blood in any case. Cited from The Writings of Thomas Jefferson, Vol. 1 (of 4), ed. by T. J. Randolph
  • The Irish Attainder Act was not brought in till the end of June. Cited from Thomas Davis, Selections from his Prose and Poetry, by Thomas Davis
  • Through the attainder of the Duke the Crown eventually obtained possession of it. Cited from Hammersmith, Fulham and Putney, by Mitton and Geikie
  • An act of attainder is surely not more a departure from the ordinary course of law than a civil war. Cited from Critical and Historical Essays, by Macaulay V1
  • There was nothing to be done except to proceed with his attainder. Cited from The Reign of Henry the Eighth, Volume 1 (of 3), by James Anthony Froude
  • No bill of attainder, or ex-post-facto law, shall he passed. Cited from Elements of Civil Government, by Alexander L. Peterman
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Words starting with attainder

Meaning of attainder

  • noun Cancellation of civil rights