Asteroid Survey

19 examples (0.04 sec)
  • Modern asteroid survey systems now use automated means to locate new minor planets in ever-increasing quantities.
  • When it concluded there was another survey, the UAO-DLR Asteroid Survey, this time with a focus on Near Earth asteroids and both surveys discovered numerous objects.
  • He participated in the OCA DLR Asteroid Survey (ODAS), which also discovered some asteroids during its 30-month lifetime.
  • The Anglo-Australian Near-Earth Asteroid Survey (AANEAS) operated from 1990-96, becoming one of the most prolific programs of its type in the world.
  • Don't confused it with the Uppsala-DLR Asteroid Survey (UDAS), which started shortly after the UDTS concluded.
  • Helin organized and coordinated the International Near-Earth Asteroid Survey (INAS) during the 1980s, encouraging and stimulating worldwide interest in asteroids.
  • Due to inaccuracies in the asteroid's computed orbit it was subsequently lost and not recovered until 2000 by Jeffrey Larsen using data from the Spacewatch asteroid survey project.
  • The OCA-DLR Asteroid Survey (ODAS) was a European scientific project to search for asteroids and comets.
  • Due to inaccuracies in its computed orbit, Albert was also lost and not recovered until 2000, when Jeffrey A. Larsen located it using data from the Spacewatch asteroid survey project.
  • The Asiago-DLR Asteroid Survey (ADAS) is a project to search for comets and asteroids, with special emphasis on near-Earth objects.
  • However, the object was precovered by the Anglo-Australian Near-Earth Asteroid Survey on six photographic plates from the UK Schmidt Telescope dating back to 1974.
  • It is named for American astronomer Tad Pryor in honor of his participation in the Palomar Planet-Crossing Asteroid Survey when he was as an undergraduate student at Caltech.
  • Active member of the Asiago-DLR Asteroid Survey, he is Associated Scientist of the OSIRIS two-camera system instrument on board the European Space Agency's Rosetta (spacecraft) mission.
  • It is named after American solar astronomer Patricia L. Bornmann in honor of her participation in the Palomar Planet-Crossing Asteroid Survey as an undergraduate student at Caltech.
  • Discovered in 1981 in the course of the UK Schmidt-Caltech Asteroid Survey, this asteroid was originally designated as "1981 EC."
  • Ida's reflection spectrum was measured on 16 September 1980 by astronomers David J. Tholen and Edward F. Tedesco as part of the eight-color asteroid survey (ECAS).
  • Comet 207P/NEAT (P/2001 J1), discovered in 2001 by the NEAT asteroid survey, was also found to have a similar orbit to Biela's Comet, and it was initially thought possible that it was in some way related to it.
  • This was intended as an extension of the Yerkes-McDonald asteroid survey conducted in 1950-1952 by Gerard Kuiper, which was limited to magnitude 16.
  • It is named for American astronomer Tod R. Lauer in honor of his participation in the Palomar Planet-Crossing Asteroid Survey during 1976-77 as an undergraduate student at Caltech.