astern of the ship

23 examples (0.06 sec)
  • The people set up a shout of joy when they saw him like a large island floating astern of the ship. Cited from Marmaduke Merry, by William H. G. Kingston
  • He well knew, however, that their chances of being seen would have been trebled could they have been ahead instead of astern of the ship. Cited from Jack Tier, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • As the boat passed some twenty yards astern of the ship the man who was not rowing turned round for a moment and looked up at Ronald. Cited from Bonnie Prince Charlie, by G. A. Henty
  • I was surprised to perceive that we had come up astern of the ship -- quite without reason I had expected to find her lying bow on. Cited from The Mutineers, by Charles Boardman Hawes
  • The channel, also, was plainly visible directly astern of the ship, the sea merely rising and falling in it without combing. Cited from Homeward Bound, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • As the day went on and the birds' hunger was satisfied, they scattered, and such of them as continued to fly astern of the ship were a long way off. Cited from Worst Journey in the World, Volumes 1 and 2, by Apsley Cherry-Garrard
  • The ship survived; but when the storm was over and the people swarmed up once more into the pure ocean atmosphere and saw the western sun set clear, it set astern of the ship. Cited from Strange True Stories of Louisiana, by George Washington Cable
  • In the meantime, we had been swept astern of the ship, and being quite out of her lee, were at the mercy of the tremendous sea which was still running. Cited from At Whispering Pine Lodge, by Lawrence J. Leslie
  • If you slide quietly down by it, and then let yourself drift till you are well astern of the ship, the sentry on the quarterdeck will not see you. Cited from With Wolfe in Canada, by G. A. Henty
  • The colonel, glancing round for a good background against which to place himself, noticed a large clump of trees with olive-green foliage growing at a short distance directly astern of the ship. Cited from The Log of the Flying Fish, by Harry Collingwood
  • The men obeyed him, and rowing while he steered, they presently fell astern of the ship, in the midst of the darkness and tumult and terror. Cited from Journal of a Residence on a Georgian Plantation, by Frances Anne Kemble
  • I heard another shout, and as I rose to the top of a wave I saw just astern of the ship a black head and face -- it was Potto Jumbo. Cited from In the Eastern Seas, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • The gulls were flying in numbers astern of the ship, darting down and seizing every thing edible which was thrown overboard, and the conversation turned upon aquatic birds. Cited from The Mission, by Frederick Marryat
  • Some, however, were swimming and a few appeared to be about a ship's length astern of the ship, at some distance from the rafts, probably having jumped overboard very soon after the ship was torpedoed. Cited from Kelly Miller's History of the World War for Human Rights, Kelly Miller
  • The gulls were flying in numbers astern of the ship, darting down and seizing everything edible which was thrown overboard, and the conversation turned upon aquatic birds. Cited from The Mission; or Scenes in Africa, by Captain Frederick Marryat
  • I then bent on a heaving-line to one end of the hawser, which, by this means, I got to the cutter, when we moored her securely astern of the ship. Cited from For Treasure Bound, by Harry Collingwood
  • Guanaco Hill was directly astern of the ship; they had absolutely no trouble in maintaining a straight line for their destination, all that was necessary being to keep the mast-head light in the exact center of the green and red points. Cited from The Captain of the Kansas, by Louis Tracy
  • The captain and his companion cautiously descended to the sands, and passing astern of the ship, they first took their way to the jolly-boat, which lay at the rocks in readiness to carry off the two officers to the launch. Cited from Homeward Bound, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • The boats continued astern of the ship in the direction of the drift of the tide from her, and took up the people that had hold of rafts and other floating things that had been cast loose, for the purpose of supporting them on the water. Cited from The Mutiny of the Bounty, by Sir John Barrow
  • Astern of the ship, however, a rounded ridge of sand began to appear as the tide fell, within forty fathoms of the vessel, and as the bottom was hard, and difficult to get an anchor into it, there was the risk of dragging on this bank. Cited from Homeward Bound, by James Fenimore Cooper
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