as presumptuous

25 examples (0.02 sec)
  • And I've concluded that in your heart you must look on me as presumptuous and stupid. Cited from The Enchanted Canyon, by Honore Willsie Morrow
  • This observation on the part of the youthful secretary seemed to be regarded by the governor as presumptuous. Cited from An Enemy To The King, by Robert Neilson Stephens
  • "It will sound as presumptuous in your ears as it does in mine -- but what is to be done except put the thing to the question?" Cited from Home Again, by George MacDonald
  • How unnecessary therefore as well as presumptuous are the Rationalistic interpretations which have been put upon the event by certain German writers! Cited from The Fair Haven, by Samuel Butler
  • We trust it will not be regarded as presumptuous if we say a word in relation to the facilities we have enjoyed and the methods we have used in the preparation of this work. Cited from Abraham Lincoln: A History V1, by Nicolay & Hay
  • That might have been resented as presumptuous; but he has a right to point out the danger, and he leaves the centurion to settle how to meet it. Cited from Expositions of Holy Scripture: Acts, by Maclaren
  • And yet when he spoke these words, they were not scouted as presumptuous folly: to most Frenchmen they seemed sober truth and practical good sense. Cited from The Life of Napoleon I (Volume 1 of 2), by John Holland Rose
  • But he ought to know too how to pray, without asking God to alter those laws, as presumptuous and superstitious men are wont to do. Cited from Discipline and Other Sermons, by Charles Kingsley
  • And even though disallowed as presumptuous, it is an instinctive one. Cited from Poetry, by Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch
  • He had put the matter even more resolutely aside because, once or twice, the count had said things that might be construed as hints that he should not regard such an act as presumptuous. Cited from With Frederick the Great, A Story of the Seven Years' War, by G.A. Henty
  • Were the case before us an ordinary one, I should reject such an attempt as presumptuous and futile; but it is not only different from all others, but, in truth, peculiar. Cited from The Prose Works of William Wordsworth, by William Wordsworth
  • The argument that the proposed government could better serve the general interests of the public, or even the cause of the war, than a purely Liberal government, of which he would be the head, probably struck him as presumptuous. Cited from Laurier: A Study in Canadian Politics, by J. W. Dafoe
  • If you do not regard my visit as presumptuous, and do not write me in the mean while forbidding it, I shall do myself the pleasure of waiting on you the morning after my arrival in Groveland. Cited from The Wife of his Youth and Other Stories of the Color Line, by Chesnutt
  • Though now, as at other times, this seemed as presumptuous to him as if some devotee had sacrilegiously fallen in love with his fair patron saint, still he felt a sudden and strong irritation that they should be so far apart. Cited from From Jest to Earnest, by E. P. Roe
  • Andalusia's petition for autonomy on the same grounds was perceived as presumptuous because it had always been part of Castile after the Reconquista.
  • The former, indeed, being at man's disposal, may be conferred on me and on many others, but the latter it is as presumptuous to hope for as it is difficult to reach, being in the gift of heaven alone. Cited from The Letters of the Younger Pliny, various, Vol. 1
  • He is represented as presumptuous, rash, and overbearing, but gallant and generous. Cited from Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1, by Brewer
  • Yet it happens accidentally that a man is ashamed of them either because he looks upon them as vicious according to human opinion, or because he is afraid of being marked as presumptuous or hypocritical for doing virtuous deeds. Cited from Summa Theologica, Part II-II (Secunda Secundae), by Thomas Aquinas
  • In the course of 1673 our author's pen was engaged in a task, which may be safely condemned as presumptuous, though that pen was Dryden's. Cited from The Dramatic Works of John Dryden, Vol. I, ed. by Sir Walter Scott
  • More importantly, perpetual pestering pertaining pecuniary provisions, perceived as presumptuous political provocation, proved positively painful, preventing provincial pleasure.
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