are perishable

24 examples (0.02 sec)
  • But evil also is perishable and bad men meet their judge. Cited from On Nothing & Kindred Subjects, Hilaire Belloc
  • The Duke never sent them on, but then they were perishable. Cited from Berry And Co., by Dornford Yates
  • Yet, after all, the fabric may fall; for the work of man is perishable. Cited from Studies in Civics, by James T. McCleary
  • Therefore, if there is nothing but what is perishable in the composition of all animals, there is no animal eternal. Cited from Cicero's Tusculan Disputations, by Marcus Tullius Cicero
  • "The works of man are perishable, but the works of God last forever." Cited from Andreas Hofer, by Lousia Muhlbach
  • All that is perishable on earth is swept aside like a used garment. Cited from Garman and Worse, by Alexander Lange Kielland
  • Actions are perishable and can lead to no lasting result. Cited from The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 4
  • It also reminds us that the body is perishable and shall one day be reduced to ashes.
  • For the first element of man is perishable matter. Cited from Marzio's Crucifix and Zoroaster, by F. Marion Crawford
  • While cocoa beans are perishable, they can be held in storage for several years.
  • If most words are perishable stuff, what is it that keeps other words from perishing? Cited from A Study of Poetry, by Bliss Perry
  • Instead of working for what is perishable, we work for that which endureth to everlasting life. Cited from Life and Labors of Elder John Kline, the Martyr Missionary, John Kline
  • Here do lovers show that they are perishable. Cited from The Egoist, by George Meredith
  • This happens mostly when the item is perishable and has to get to the market fresh before it starts to rot.
  • All is perishable, only God's word remains for ever, and God's word is revealed in the creations of genius. Cited from Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt, Volume 1
  • I. It is the only faith that lifts man's soul, which is immortal, above his body, which is perishable. Cited from What Peace Means, by Henry van Dyke
  • We can distinguish in Milton between the Puritanic theology which is perishable, and the art whose beauty can never pass away. Cited from Browning as a Philosophical and Religious Teacher, by Henry Jones
  • Statues raised by the hand of man are perishable as man himself; the works constructed by a genius are immortal as the genius himself. Cited from Rashi, by Maurice Liber
  • However, at the ball, one of the shipowners insists that he must sail at once, as his cargo is perishable.
  • Every other source of plenty is perishable or casual. Cited from The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes, Vol. V, by Samuel Johnson
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