apprehension that they

34 examples (0.04 sec)
  • His military and political talents might therefore now be used without any apprehension that they would be turned against the government which used them. Cited from History of England, James II V. 5, Macaulay
  • I was under an apprehension that they might arrive by some route without my knowledge, while I should be penetrating south. Cited from The Albert N'Yanza, Great Basin of the Nile, Baker
  • I took my pistols now with an undefined apprehension that they might be really needed before my return tonight. Cited from Room in the Dragon Volant, by J. Sheridan LeFanu
  • We ourselves were not without some apprehension that they might leave us, but as they continued to say that they would return with us nothing was said upon the subject. Cited from Expedition of Captains Lewis and Clark, Vol. I., by Lewis and Clark
  • Paul snapped his teeth; he had an awful apprehension that they might spoil it all before he got there. Cited from Youth and the Bright Medusa, by Willa Cather
  • Gypsy had a secret apprehension that they were preparing for a very luxurious sort of camp-life. Cited from Gypsy Breynton, by Elizabeth Stuart Phelps
  • We left a Canadian with them and proceeded, not without apprehension that they would follow us and derange our whole plan by their obstinacy. Cited from The Journey to the Polar Sea, by John Franklin
  • We left a Canadian with them, and proceeded, not without apprehension that they would follow us, and derange our whole plan by their obstinacy. Cited from Journey to the Polar Sea, 1819-22, Volume 2, by John Franklin
  • The dreadful apprehension that they were leading her to the workhouse crossed my mind, and I would have avoided her if I could. Cited from The Grimke Sisters, by Catherine H. Birney
  • Crockett had no more apprehension that they would trouble him than he had that the elk or the deer would make a midnight attack upon his cabin. Cited from David Crockett, by John S. C. Abbott
  • If in the progress of the war they should be called to bear arms, there need be no reasonable apprehension that they would exhibit the ferocity of savage races. Cited from The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 8, No. 49, November, 1861, by Various
  • Don't you think they have done that under the apprehension that they would not get a berth in the following year, if they did not do so?-I don't know that. Cited from Second Shetland Truck System Report, by Guthrie
  • They, also, were frightened by the mystery and allusiveness of the tales, and had an apprehension that they would not be popular. Cited from Lane Had No Turning, by G. Parker, v1
  • When Christ was seized and carried to his trial, his disciples fled, out of a just apprehension that they should, if apprehended, be sacrificed with their master. Cited from Trial of Witnessses of the Resurrection of Jesus
  • He noted with rising apprehension that they checked the pace of their horses as they approached, and that they reined to either side of the road to compel him to go between them. Cited from The Guns of Shiloh, by Joseph A. Altsheler
  • It will promote peace and tranquillity among the inhabitants, by allaying all apprehension that they may still entertain of being again subjected to the jurisdiction of Mexico. Cited from Messages and Papers of the Presidents: James Knox Polk, by Richardson
  • I believe this is every one's experience; but an apprehension that they may belie themselves in the future prevents mankind from trumpeting this cheerful sentiment abroad. Cited from The Pocket R.L.S., by Robert Louis Stevenson
  • They worked so perseveringly, that at first I had some little apprehension that they would succeed, and I began to consider how, if the tree fell, I should manage to escape my assailants. Cited from Manco, the Peruvian Chief, by W.H.G. Kingston
  • As these offences apply only to those who have no right to eat, the wealthy and respectable portion of society need be under no apprehension that they will be exposed to any inconvenience by the operation of the new law. Cited from Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 1, Complete, ed. by Sir Mark Lemon
  • As the cash would be inadequate, however, for my needs, I decided after considerable deliberation to take the family jewels, though not without apprehension that they might lead to my detection, as they finally did. Cited from That Mainwaring Affair, by Maynard Barbour
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