apprehension that she

27 examples (0.02 sec)
  • The terrible apprehension that she might, by some accident, have fallen into the river returned upon him. Cited from The King's Highway, by G.P.R. James
  • Never had he seen her more beautiful; and the apprehension that she would never be his was like a hand straining over his heart. Cited from A Splendid Hazard, by Harold MacGrath
  • Her eyes sought his once more, and she smiled inwardly at the tinge of apprehension that she read in them. Cited from House of Mirth, by Edith Wharton
  • The cook sent up the dinner with just enough want of care to keep her in such continual apprehension that she could hardly attend to the conversation. Cited from Heartsease or Brother's Wife by Charlotte M. Yonge
  • At the same time, he felt a pang of apprehension that she had found places in her school for the two young daughters of his supposititious country friend. Cited from Round the Block, by John Bell Bouton
  • After she had reached her room she waited, listening, shaken by the apprehension that she should hear her father come out again and go up to Godfrey. Cited from The Marriages, by Henry James
  • It seemed to her that her aunt was meddlesome; and from this came a vague apprehension that she would spoil something. Cited from Washington Square, by Henry James
  • It was remembered that she had appeared singularly for some days previous, and the knowledge of her constitutional low spirits, led to the apprehension that she had made way with herself. Cited from Timothy Crump's Ward, Horatio Alger
  • Family life had indeed become of late a mystery, and behind the mystery there was a dim sense of apprehension, apprehension that she had never felt in all her days before. Cited from The Cathedral, by Hugh Walpole
  • Her relief that the Princess had gone before the house was searched gave place to the apprehension that she had gone to join Captain Ellerey. Cited from Princess Maritza, by Percy Brebner
  • Filled with apprehension that she would meet Lord Donal coming up, she had difficulty in timing her footsteps to the slow measure that was necessary. Cited from Jennie Baxter, Journalist, by Robert Barr
  • His eyes pounced on hers with the same look of mixed boldness and apprehension that she had marked before; she saw that he caught his breath before answering. Cited from The Fur Bringers, by Hulbert Footner
  • I knew the weakness of hers -- I knew hers -- and felt the apprehension that she might fail at the proper moment, even more vividly than she expressed it. Cited from Confession, by W. Gilmore Simms
  • I then hinted at the generous annual tender which Lord M. and his sisters made to his fair cousin, in apprehension that she might suffer by her friends' implacableness. Cited from Clarissa, Vol. 8 (of 9), by Samuel Richardson
  • Beck sat where he was, overwhelmed and stupefied at this sudden blow which had fallen upon his domestic happiness, and with a horrible apprehension that she might have meant what she said in real earnest. Cited from The Pilot and his Wife, by Jonas Lie
  • And again Annie saw, this time in the old man's eyes, the flicker of sympathy and apprehension that she had marked in Aunt Dolcey's. Cited from O. Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories of 1921, by Various
  • Because she had been afraid she might succumb to the pleas of this giant, she had burned her bridges behind her -- in her groundless apprehension that she might make a terrible mistake, she had made a worse one. Cited from Tarzan of the Apes, Edgar Rice Burroughs
  • I told those lawyers to wait a little for further instructions, because I was anxious to hear how this interview would end, feeling some apprehension that she might relapse into obstinacy; but now that she has consented, we shall go on. Cited from Black Baronet; or, The Chronicles Of Ballytrain, by William Carleton
  • Neither did he wish her to mingle much with the world, from a latent apprehension that she might tind it a different thing from what he himself represented it to be; and perhaps might learn there the low estimate which it had formed of her future husband. Cited from Black Baronet; or, The Chronicles Of Ballytrain, by William Carleton
  • She was haunted by the expression of his face, by the tone of his voice, when he had asked her if she supposed that existence was any longer valuable to him, and the sudden instinctive apprehension that she had felt then now grew so strong that she fought against it vainly. Cited from The Devil's Garden, by W. B. Maxwell
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