apprehension than

41 examples (0.04 sec)
  • On the whole, I used to think her rather more slow of apprehension than most of her companions. Cited from The Annals of the Poor, by Legh Richmond
  • Still the trouble was more in apprehension than in reality. Cited from A Houseful of Girls, by Sarah Tytler
  • The horses seem to regard the rushing volume of yellow water about them with far less apprehension than do their riders. Cited from Around the World on a Bicycle Volume II., by Thomas Stevens
  • I had not been long however in this new situation, before an incident occurred which filled me with greater alarm and apprehension than ever. Cited from Caleb Williams, by William Godwin
  • All looked forward with anxiety to the result; but no one with more apprehension than Cromwell. Cited from The History of England, by John Lingard and Hilaire Belloc, Vol. 8
  • At present there was more room for apprehension than reflection. Cited from Anne Bradstreet and Her Time, by Helen Campbell
  • My faults, I said, whatever they had been, were rather faults in her apprehension than in fact. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 5 (of 9), by Samuel Richardson
  • She guessed his thoughts and the idea of selling these jewels gave her even greater apprehension than the terrors that the future involved. Cited from Mare Nostrum (Our Sea), by Vicente Blasco Ibanez
  • Erica began to shiver a little, more from apprehension than from cold. Cited from We Two, by Edna Lyall
  • Evils are often greater in apprehension than in reality. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 4 (of 9), by Samuel Richardson
  • Hence his book is fuller of apprehension than of guidance, more plausible in alarm than wise or useful in direction. Cited from Studies in Literature, by John Morley
  • The suffering which Lapham must inflict on him if he decided against him had been more to her apprehension than the harm he might do if he decided for him. Cited from Entire PG Edition of William Dean Howells
  • The Greeks with their small states had a far clearer apprehension than we can have of the dependence of a constitution upon the people who have to work it. Cited from Politics: A Treatise on Government, by Aristotle
  • Involuntarily, although her first impression (based upon other meetings with distinguished men) was one more of apprehension than of pleasure, she swept him a deep curtsy. Cited from The Purchase Price, by Emerson Hough
  • This last was a painful duty, though Mrs. Willoughby and her daughters heard the truth with less of apprehension than the husband and father had anticipated. Cited from Wyandotte, by James Fenimore Cooper
  • At the end of twenty minutes, in which we had scarcely moved or spoken, we were as cold as icebergs, but more, I think, from apprehension than the atmosphere. Cited from The Club of Queer Trades, by G. K. Chesterton/GKC8
  • Our own commerce has suffered, is suffering, rather in apprehension than in fact, rather because so many of our ships are timidly keeping to their home ports than because American ships have been sunk. Cited from President Wilson's Addresses, by Woodrow Wilson
  • Sometimes he would sit for a minute with his long thin hand pressed hard upon his heart; then he would start away afresh, but rather by the impulse of apprehension than by that of renewed strength. Cited from The Shadow of a Crime, by Hall Caine
  • So that all the elements and attributes of his being stand and work together in living coherence, thus rendering him no less substantive and personal to our apprehension than he is original and peculiar in himself. Cited from Shakespeare: His Life, Art, And Characters, Volume I, by H. N. Hudson
  • Dear me, yes, while you were fast asleep and dreaming, with no other apprehension than that of being sent to prison by the members of the Commune, a guillotine was being made. Cited from Paris under the Commune, by John Leighton
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