an exile from his

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  • At a later period, when an exile from his country, and at open war with the Church, he spoke out. Cited from Critical and Historical Essays, by Macaulay V2
  • Though born in England, he passed the greater part of his life in Normandy as an exile from his native land. Cited from Famous Men of the Middle Ages, by Haaren & Poland
  • Whoever, by becoming an exile from his country, escaped likewise from himself? Cited from The Works of Horace, by Horace [Tr.: C. Smart]
  • Strophius, my father, being enraged, hath driven me an exile from his house. Cited from The Tragedies of Euripides, Volume I, by Euripides
  • Division bitterer than that war in which he had fought lay between them, the division that had embittered his life and made him an exile from his people. Cited from Gordon Keith, by Thomas Nelson Page
  • In one of his letters he had spoken of himself as "an exile from his dear Land, which is always the land where my loved ones are." Cited from [A Biography of] Sidney Lanier, by Edwin Mims
  • Thirty years ago there was a young man in an Italian town; he was an exile from his native land and found himself reduced to the depths of poverty. Cited from Emile, by Jean-Jacques Rousseau
  • Behold the great Pontiac, whose grave I saw near St. Louis; he was murdered while an exile from his country! Cited from Indian Heroes & Great Chieftains, Charles Eastman
  • And, so, from not knowing how to resemble Brutus, he lost power, and fame, and was driven an exile from his country. Cited from Discourses on the First Decade of Titus Livius, by Niccolo Machiavelli
  • In the meanwhile, the affairs of the Papacy had not improved -- Innocent was still an exile from his see. Cited from The World's Greatest Books, Vol X, Ed. by Arthur Mee & J.A. Hammerton
  • De la Tour, himself an exile from his province, wandered about the New World in his customary pursuit of peltry. Cited from The Complete Writings of Charles Dudley Warner V1
  • If the latter succeeds not, he vows that the Harlowes shall feel the former, although for it he become an exile from his country forever. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 1 of 9, by Samuel Richardson
  • If Hutchinson had understood this lesson and remembered it, he need not in after years have been an exile from his native country, nor finally have laid his bones in a distant land. Cited from Book of Old Ballads, ed. B. Nichols, Vol. 4
  • Ulysses, sole of all the victor train, An exile from his dear paternal coast, Deplored his absent queen and empire lost. Cited from The Odyssey, by Homer, Tr. by Samuel butler
  • But, my dear sir, it is natural, on the other hand, for an exile from his native land to turn with fond remembrance to its excellences and forget its defects. Cited from Samuel F. B. Morse, His Letters and Journals, by Samuel F. B. Morse
  • Sir Hugh felt that he might be a very valuable ally, and began to regret now that his fears had made him so long an exile from his country and a wanderer from home. Cited from In the Days of Chivalry, by Evelyn Everett-Green
  • He was himself a victim of the tender passion to the extent of being an exile from his Virginia home, which he had left on account of dangerously wounding a rival. Cited from Alice of Old Vincennes, Maurice Thompson
  • If Hutchinson had understood this lesson, and remembered it, he need not, in after years, have been an exile from his native country, nor finally have laid his bones in a distant land. Cited from True Stories of History and Biography, by Nathaniel Hawthorne
  • The colonel was an exile from his country for no grave crime: but, as he told us, as much an exile as if he had committed a capital offence in being the father of nine healthy girls. Cited from Adventures Harry Richmond by Meredith, v8
  • Like his countrymen, he was driven an exile from his old home, from his fields, work-shops, and orchards by the clear streams flowing from the mountains of Georgia. Cited from Se-quo-yah, from Harper's New Monthly, Vol. 41
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