an alloy

804 examples (0.04 sec)
  • White gold is an alloy of gold and at least one white metal.
  • Almost every piece of metal is an alloy of one type or another.
  • No special use has yet been found for it, except as an alloy with Al. Cited from An Introduction to Chemical Science by RP Williams
  • Even the gold of which it was made was an alloy of a different type from anything on record. Cited from How To Write Special Feature Articles, by Willard Grosvenor Bleyer
  • Of the two latter they formed an alloy, and made tools of the bronze. Cited from Mexico, by Charles Reginald Enock
  • It has an alloy cylinder head and a closed deck iron engine block.
  • Gold ornaments typically were made of an alloy with a high degree of gold.
  • As we have already seen, this mixture forms an alloy of a very peculiar nature. Cited from Great Astronomers, by R. S. Ball
  • Such an alloy must contain but is not limited to one or more of these metals.
  • This can include pure iron, such as wrought iron, or an alloy such as steel.
  • Tungsten, as an alloy in steel, has been known and used for a long time. Cited from The Working of Steel, by Fred H. Colvin and A. Juthe
  • The main wings and tail were intended to be made from an alloy, not steel.
  • However, this system of calculation gives only the mass of pure gold contained in an alloy.
  • By far the most common use of molybdenum is as an alloy with iron.
  • He created "structure maps" which determine which crystal structure an alloy will form.
  • The engine unit sat in an alloy cradle ahead of the front wheel, together forming part of its support.
  • The division here is home to a both an Alloy and Casting facility.
  • The material that was cut formed a prototype of the character from which type was cast by various means from an alloy usually containing lead.
  • An alloy that was very common -- as common as brass, for example. Cited from The Country of the Blind, And Other Stories, by H. G. Wells
  • Such an alloy is especially useful in type founding, where fine lines are to be reproduced on a cast. Cited from An Elementary Study of Chemistry, by McPherson and Henderson
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