an affront

747 examples (0.01 sec)
  • Any one almost would take it for an affront to be asked what he meant by it. Cited from An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding, Volume II., by John Locke
  • Never before in her life had she known such an affront. Cited from Marion's Faith, by Charles King
  • She felt that it would have been an affront to his memory.
  • But that was not his way of meeting so great an affront. Cited from The Grammar School Boys in Summer Athletics, by H. Irving Hancock
  • He neither gave him an affront, nor intended him any. Cited from Andrew Marvell, by Augustine Birrell
  • His continued indifference to her they took almost as an affront to themselves. Cited from Zuleika Dobson, by Max Beerbohm
  • Must one even think what to do in so gross an affront? Cited from Amphitryon, A play by Moliere, Tr. by Waller
  • It would have been an affront to offer these good people anything in return for their kindness. Cited from Holidays in Eastern France, M. Betham-Edwards
  • He considered the bill to be an affront to his character.
  • It was an affront to her beauty, and she was still beautiful. Cited from The Titan, by Theodore Dreiser
  • Lavedan raised his head suddenly, after the manner of a man who has received an affront. Cited from Bardelys the Magnificent, by Rafael Sabatini
  • To go outside his small circle is to offer an affront. Cited from The Vitalized School, by Francis B. Pearson
  • My helps would leave the house if I dared to put such an affront upon them. Cited from Roughing it in the Bush, by Susanna Moodie
  • I won't accept an affront like this -- not to let me hold the rope alone! Cited from Hadda Padda, by Godmunder Kamban
  • In doing this I had no intention of an affront to the court. Cited from The Felon's Track, by Michael Doheny
  • His thoughts were murderous; he could have killed the man who had put such an affront upon him. Cited from Jean-Christophe, Vol. I, by Romain Rolland
  • Such treatment constituted an affront to all art, to his own art -- literature, to himself. Cited from Under the Skylights, by Henry Blake Fuller
  • He thought it an affront to his own person that that of his daughter should be so tranquilly regarded. Cited from Athens: Rise and Fall, by Lytton, Book 2
  • Many saw it as an affront not only to government but also to justice, virtue, and religion.
  • She felt, some way, that an affront had been shown her by the absence of the one for whom it was laid. Cited from The Ramblin' Kid, by Earl Wayland Bowman
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