affront to

653 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Any one almost would take it for an affront to be asked what he meant by it. Cited from An Essay Concerning Humane Understanding, Volume II., by John Locke
  • She felt that it would have been an affront to his memory.
  • His continued indifference to her they took almost as an affront to themselves. Cited from Zuleika Dobson, by Max Beerbohm
  • No, but they remain still as a very affront to marriage. Cited from The New Atlantis, by Francis Bacon
  • It would have been an affront to offer these good people anything in return for their kindness. Cited from Holidays in Eastern France, M. Betham-Edwards
  • He considered the bill to be an affront to his character.
  • I am satisfied you meant no affront to my sister! Cited from The Golden Dog, by William Kirby
  • It was an affront to her beauty, and she was still beautiful. Cited from The Titan, by Theodore Dreiser
  • It is the affront to her that has made me forget myself. Cited from A Perilous Secret, by Charles Reade
  • Do you see that we have the same interest to-day, a common affront to avenge? Cited from Cosmopolis by Paul Bourget, v3
  • There is general indignation because of his affront to the wife of one of our number. Cited from Under Fire, by Charles King
  • Yet, after all, he had not offered the worst affront to party discipline. Cited from Sir George Tressady, Vol. II, by Mrs. Humphry Ward
  • The man, it seems, was of rank, and offered some slight affront to her. Cited from The History of Sir Charles Grandison, Volume 4 (of 7), Samuel Richardson
  • Who but a woman that feels herself above convention would dare offer this affront to society? Cited from The Puppet Crown, by Harold MacGrath
  • In doing this I had no intention of an affront to the court. Cited from The Felon's Track, by Michael Doheny
  • The two performers were distant enough to be no affront to each other. Cited from Somewhere in Red Gap, by Harry Leon Wilson
  • Such treatment constituted an affront to all art, to his own art -- literature, to himself. Cited from Under the Skylights, by Henry Blake Fuller
  • He thought it an affront to his own person that that of his daughter should be so tranquilly regarded. Cited from Athens: Rise and Fall, by Lytton, Book 2
  • The man's conduct was a hurt and an affront to all of them. Cited from A Son Of The Sun, by Jack London
  • He took the matter as an affront to him. Cited from Red Badge of Courage, Stephen Crane
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