affront on

29 examples (0.03 sec)
  • Yet I had put a terrible affront on her, and it might be that she would not receive me. Cited from Simon Dale, by Anthony Hope
  • A deliberately designed affront on the part of another man, it therefore remained to the end of his days. Cited from Contributions to: All The Year Round, Dickens #48
  • "No man shall brook life after he has passed an affront on Douglas." Cited from The Fair Maid of Perth, by Sir Walter Scott
  • It is quite right; London put an affront on him, Paris owes him an ovation. Cited from Napoleon the Little, by Victor Hugo
  • He reckoned on the Mayor taking some action that would stop the reception and thereby put a public affront on Boyce. Cited from The Red Planet, William J. Locke
  • Indeed, Torloisk liked so little to see the lad, that he determined to put some affront on him, which should prevent his returning to the castle for some time. Cited from The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 12, Issue 345
  • I will choose my occasion shrewdly, put an affront on him one evening in his cups, when drink shall have made him valiant enough to commit himself to a meeting. Cited from The Historical Nights Entertainment, Second Series
  • The disappointment that followed he took calmly -- being on the whole a sweet-tempered man, nor easily angered except by an affront on his vanity. Cited from The Delectable Duchy, by Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch
  • Though the decision was largely welcomed in the South, the decision outraged abolitionists and non-slaveholding states as another affront on states' rights.
  • He feels its superiority an affront on his barbarism. Cited from The British Barbarians, by Grant Allen
  • In a few days, it appeared that the representations by which they had induced the King to put this gross and public affront on his mother were unfounded. Cited from Critical and Historical Essays, by Macaulay V1
  • He considered it as a personal affront on the part of Fate that just as he was beginning to find the voyage endurable this prancing young montebank should appear to spoil everything. Cited from The Honorable Percival, by Alice Hegan Rice
  • M. de Fontelles did not leave his place, but stood, with the point of his naked sword on the ground, looking at the man who had put an affront on him and whom he had now chastised. Cited from Simon Dale, by Anthony Hope
  • Had he ever been tyrannical, harsh, unsympathetic even, that instead of coming to him as to their father and Master they should have put this public affront on him and appealed straight away to the Bishop? Cited from Brother Copas, by Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch
  • The aggressor, whose jealous fury had driven him almost to madness when he committed an outrageous affront on a stranger, was a tall, handsome, dark-complexioned young fellow. Cited from Sketches From My Life, by Hobart Pasha
  • It is one of those extraordinary instances in which we ought not to be contented with the bare negative of Congress, because it is an affront on the multitude as well as on the government. Cited from The American Crisis, by Thomas Paine
  • The supreme Aesculapius was accordingly called in; and his humbler brother swore, in the bitterness of his soul, that he would never forget the affront on this side of death's door. Cited from The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 12, No. 348
  • Those who viewed the business in the worst light insisted that King Magnus wanted to break the agreement, and that he had done King Harald injustice, and put an affront on him. Cited from Heimskringla [Norwegian Kings], by Snorri Sturlson
  • This decided political bias may, perhaps, in some measure, account for the disposition to affront on the side of Sinclair, and the quickness to resent on the other hand, which was shown between the parties. Cited from Memoirs of the Jacobites of 1715 and 1745, Vol. I, by Mrs. Thomson
  • These last had put a cruel affront on the former, the nature of which you will see in the course of the following description: but I shall call the Micmaquis the aggressors, because the first acts of hostility in the field began from them. Cited from Customs And Manners Of The Micmakis And Maricheets, by Maillard
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