affront from

21 examples (0.03 sec)
  • But he met with no other affront from Apollyon quite through this valley. Cited from Book of Old Ballads, ed. B. Nichols, Vol. 4
  • But he met with no other affront from Apollyon quite through the valley. Cited from Bible Stories and Religious Classics, by Philip P. Wells
  • Kitty was a dignified young lady, and she would not tolerate such an affront from any man alive. Cited from The Voice in the Fog, by Harold MacGrath
  • Let me tell you, my dear, that Mr. Hickman is such a one as would rather bear an affront from a lady, than offer one to her. Cited from Clarissa, Volume 3 (of 9),by Samuel Richardson
  • Have you not often told me that the honour of a man consisted in receiving no affront from his own sex, and that of woman in receiving no kindness from ours? Cited from Jonathan Wild, by Henry Fielding
  • It was said, that he received an affront from James, in the shape of a public reprimand, which his pride could not forgive. Cited from Jack Sheppard, by William Harrison Ainsworth
  • But he did not take affront from womenkind. Cited from The Tidal Wave and Other Stories, by Ethel May Dell
  • It had dismayed him then, as we have seen, that this man who, he thought, must stomach any affront from him out of consideration for his sister, should have ended by calling him to account. Cited from Mistress Wilding, by Rafael Sabatini
  • The time was when he could not deign an answer to a petition from America, and the time now is when he dare not give an answer to an affront from France. Cited from The American Crisis, by Thomas Paine
  • He made a gesture of disgust, and his face burned with the shame of a proud man who has received an affront from an inferior -- and who knows it to be his own fault. Cited from In the Quarter, by Robert W. Chambers
  • A noble had dishonoured him by a blow; and it was vain to ask redress for this affront from any but the highest personage in the state. Cited from The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 17, No. 481
  • Those over whom I reign, however, shall see that I am no wooden idol, but a man and a monarch, who draws his sword to avenge an affront from whomsoever received. Cited from Joseph II. and His Court, by L. Muhlbach
  • But by the crass that saved us, if he tuck an affront from any of them, without payin' them home double, he is no son of mine, an' this roof won't cover him another night. Cited from The Dead Boxer, by William Carleton
  • Frank had been gone about half-an-hour, and Madame di Negra was scarcely recovered from the agitation into which she had been thrown by the affront from the father and the pleading of the son. Cited from My Novel, by E. B. Lytton, Book 11
  • As to resenting any affront from her brother, he would have felt, even if he had not naturally been of a most pacific disposition, that to wag his tongue or lift his hand against that sacred gentleman would be an unhallowed act. Cited from Little Dorrit, by Charles Dickens
  • Such an affront from my own scholar was beyond human patience; I flew into a violent passion, I flung down my instrument in a rage, and swore I was not to be taught music at my age. Cited from From This World to the Next, by Henry Fielding #2
  • Cicero writes back at much greater length to defend himself, and to prove that he had behaved as a most obliging friend to his correspondent, though he had received a gross affront from his correspondent's brother Nepos. Cited from Life of Cicero, Vol. 1 by Anthony Trollope
  • The Quaker was no sooner assured by this fellow of the birth and low fortune of Jones, than all compassion for him vanished; and the honest plain man went home fired with no less indignation than a duke would have felt at receiving an affront from such a person. Cited from The History of Tom Jones, a foundling, H. Fielding
  • And though I myself have received a mortal affront from your wife's mother, Lady Lake; though she has poured forth all the malice of which she is capable upon my devoted head; yet I would rather forgive her -- rather sue for pity from her than go the fearful length you propose. Cited from The Star-Chamber, Volume 1, by W. Harrison Ainsworth
  • On reaching that point, he learned that the Indians had received a terrible affront from an officer commanding a detachment of United States troops, who had whipped one of their chiefs; and that consequently the whole tribe was enraged, and burning for revenge upon the whites. Cited from The Old Santa Fe Trail, By Colonel Henry Inman