acknowledgeth

All Verb Noun
16 examples (0.01 sec)
  • Cnemander acknowledgeth the stars an universal cause, the particular from parents, and the use of the six non-natural things. Cited from The Anatomy of Melancholy, by Democritus Junior (Robert Burton)
  • Universality shall we follow thus, if we profess that one faith to be true which the whole Church throughout the world acknowledgeth and confesseth. Cited from Historical Sketches, Volume I (of 3), by John Henry Newman
  • Mark, first he acknowledgeth that God's way with the wicked is just and right, even then when yet he could not see the reason of his actions and dispensations towards them. Cited from Miscellaneous Pieces, by John Bunyan [Bunyan #6
  • Mark, first he acknowledgeth that God's way with the wicked is just and right, even then when yet he could not see the reason of his actings and dispensations towards them. Cited from The Works of John Bunyan Volumes 1-3, John Bunyan
  • Pighius acknowledgeth herein to be a fault, that many abuses are brought in, even into the very mass, which mass otherwise he would have seem to be a reverend matter. Cited from The Apology of the Church of England, by John Jewel
  • Now he that truly confesseth and acknowledgeth his sin, acknowledgeth also the curse to be due thereto from the righteous hand of God. Cited from The Works of John Bunyan Volume 1, by John Bunyan
  • Whoso acknowledgeth the truth, and believeth in the teachings of Jesus, can in no wise deny what hath been recited. Cited from The Summons of the Lord of Hosts, by Baha'u'llah
  • Gorrheus acknowledgeth in his medicinal definitions, the species are infinite, but they may be reduced to three kinds by reason of their seat; head, body, and hypochrondries. Cited from The Anatomy of Melancholy, by Democritus Junior (Robert Burton)
  • Herophilus acknowledgeth that a natural, but not an animal motion, and that the nerves are the cause of that motion; that then they become animals, when being first born they suck in something of the air. Cited from Works Volume 3: Essays and Miscellanies, Plutarch
  • In this confession he implicitly acknowledgeth that sin is the worst of things, forasmuch as it layeth the soul out of the reach of all remedy that can be found under heaven. Cited from The Pharisee And Publican, by John Bunyan
  • "Whosoever denieth the Son, the same hath not the Father; but he that acknowledgeth the Son hath the Father also." Cited from Secret Societies, by David MacDill, Jonathan Blanchard, & Edward Beecher
  • In this confession, he implicitly acknowledgeth, that sin is the worst of things, forasmuch as it layeth the soul without the reach of all remedy that can be found under heaven. Cited from The Works of John Bunyan Volume 2, by John Bunyan
  • He is pleased only to warrant himselfe from trouble and unrulinesse: As for weaknesse, he acknowledgeth and ingeniously avoweth the same. Cited from Literary and Philosophical Essays, by Various
  • To do those things to another, which he takes for signes of Honour, or which the Law or Custome makes so, is to Honour; because in approving the Honour done by others, he acknowledgeth the power which others acknowledge. Cited from Leviathan, by Thomas Hobbes
  • First, it acknowledgeth that the soul is a sinner, and then, that there is a sufficiency in the righteousness of Christ, to justify it in the sight of God, though a sinner. Cited from The Works of John Bunyan Volumes 1-3, John Bunyan
  • His Basilikon Doron, a manual on the powers of a king, was written to edify his four-year-old son Henry Frederick that a king "acknowledgeth himself ordained for his people, having received from the god a burden of government, whereof he must be countable."