acid gas

465 examples (0.05 sec)
  • It has, therefore, long been known that carbonic acid gas is given off at night. Cited from Outlines of Lessons in Botany, Part I; From Seed to Leaf, Jane H. Newell
  • But the formation of sulphuric acid gas may be the same in each. Cited from Lippincott's Magazine, Vol. 26, December, 1880, by Various
  • What becomes of the carbonic acid gas which the body throws off through our breath? Cited from New National Fourth Reader, by Charles J. Barnes and J. Marshall Hawkes
  • To the very last it was composed of pure carbonic acid gas. Cited from The Harvard Classics Volume 38, by Various
  • Plants take in carbonic-acid gas through their leaves, and send the oxygen back into the air ready for us to use again. Cited from First Book in Physiology and Hygiene, by J.H. Kellogg
  • Even collected under these circumstances, however, it invariably contains a portion of common air and carbonic acid gas. Cited from Treatise on Adulterations of Food, and Culinary Poisons, Fredrick Accum
  • Like some related amines, it is used in oil industry for the extraction of acid gas.
  • It had been commonly believed that carbonic acid gas was conducive to plant growth. Cited from Sir Jagadis Chunder Bose, by Sir Jagadis Chunder Bose
  • Sulphuric acid gas will make the writing disappear again, and it can be revived a second time. Cited from Disputed Handwriting, by Jerome B. Lavay
  • The materials for this process are carbonic acid gas and water. Cited from Outlines of Lessons in Botany, Part I; From Seed to Leaf, Jane H. Newell
  • The hydrochloric acid gas is rapidly given off and can be collected by displacement of air. Cited from An Elementary Study of Chemistry, by McPherson and Henderson
  • The bad air loaded with carbonic acid gas, when we first breathe it out, is warm. Cited from New National Fourth Reader, by Charles J. Barnes and J. Marshall Hawkes
  • They take in oxygen and give off carbonic-acid gas. Cited from The School Book of Forestry, by Charles Lathrop Pack
  • He tried to recollect all that he knew of carbonic acid gas, which was, in fact, not much. Cited from Roden's Corner, by Henry Seton Merriman
  • Most of these can be easiest controlled by hydrocyanic acid gas treatment. Cited from Three Acres And Liberty, by Bolton Hall
  • There it gives up its carbonic acid gas and receives a supply of oxygen. Cited from Maintaining Health, by R. L. Alsaker
  • Even you, Griggs, must know that carbonic acid gas will put out any fire, without damaging anything. Cited from Mr. Hawkins' Humorous Adventures,by Edgar Franklin
  • They carry off water and carbonic acid gas chiefly. Cited from Maintaining Health, by R. L. Alsaker
  • When the air has been changed to carbonic-acid gas, he must come to the surface to empty his air-bag and drink it full again. Cited from First Book in Physiology and Hygiene, by J.H. Kellogg
  • The carbonic acid gas time formed products minute air-cells in the bread, or, as the cook says, makes it light. Cited from American Woman's Home, by C.Beecher & H.B.Stowe#3
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