abstraction

All Noun
6,641 examples (0.02 sec)
  • The project was something of an abstraction as he had no site in mind.
  • The library provides both low level control and high level abstraction.
  • The data independence and operation independence together gives the feature of data abstraction.
  • He wanted his paintings to move beyond abstraction, as well as beyond classical art.
  • These "standard ways" are called by various names at various levels of abstraction.
  • All of them can serve as an abstraction layer for any computer language.
  • Moving to a greater level of abstraction, the real numbers can be extended to the complex numbers.
  • Programming languages offer control abstraction as one of the main purposes of their use.
  • Water is released back into the river during summer months for water abstraction and treatment further downstream.
  • "High-level language" refers to the higher level of abstraction from machine language.
  • The power of the theory comes from its level of abstraction.
  • Many early computer systems did not have any form of hardware abstraction.
  • He believed that computer science could provide the much-needed abstraction for biomolecular systems.
  • Motion should not be considered as an abstraction, separated from space and time.
  • For this reason, second generation programming languages provide one abstraction level on top of the machine code.
  • The art can be rated on its levels of abstraction or place in time.
  • Such a model remains an abstraction and depends on the intended use of the model.
  • In his view, the highest level of abstraction could make scientific generalizations about politics possible.
  • Similar to many concepts in computer science, the term can be used at different levels of abstraction.
  • She studies how processing an increasing volume of data over thousands of years brought people to think in greater abstraction.
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Words starting with abstraction

Meaning of abstraction

  • noun A concept or idea not associated with any specific instance
    he loved her only in the abstract--not in person
  • noun The act of withdrawing or removing something
  • noun The process of formulating general concepts by abstracting common properties of instances
  • noun An abstract painting
  • noun A general concept formed by extracting common features from specific examples