abstract nouns

61 examples (0.03 sec)
  • An abstract noun is something you can't see when you are looking at it. Cited from Toaster's Handbook, compiled by Peggy Edmund & Harold W. Williams
  • Also, the word 'decision' is a process which had been turned into an abstract noun.
  • Most abstract nouns belong to this category, and so do wild animals and other less common objects.
  • They are not then pure abstract nouns, nor are they common class nouns. Cited from An English Grammar, by W. M. Baskervill and J. W. Sewell
  • This class also contains many abstract nouns derived from nouns in other classes.
  • An abstract noun is something we can think of but cannot feel -- as a red hot poker. Cited from Toaster's Handbook, compiled by Peggy Edmund & Harold W. Williams
  • Proper names usually take a definite article, as do abstract nouns.
  • This German abstract noun has been adopted into English.
  • We are only too given to making an entity out of the abstract noun "consciousness." Cited from Democracy and Education, by John Dewey
  • Note that language and culture names, as well as abstract nouns, do not have plurals.
  • I do not like fighting an abstract noun. Cited from Constructive Imperialism, by Viscount Milner
  • To-day we all use abstract nouns to convey our meaning; we cannot do without words ending in -ality and -anon. Cited from The Jesus of History, by T. R. Glover
  • New abstract nouns formed in this way are always masculine.
  • Abstract nouns are names of qualities, conditions, or actions, considered abstractly, or apart from their natural connection. Cited from An English Grammar, by W. M. Baskervill and J. W. Sewell
  • Abstract nouns are made half abstract by being spoken of in the plural. Cited from An English Grammar, by W. M. Baskervill and J. W. Sewell
  • Some abstract nouns were not derived from any other part of speech, but were framed directly for the expression of certain ideas or phenomena. Cited from An English Grammar, by W. M. Baskervill and J. W. Sewell
  • The nouns included under these three heads, generally denote abstract qualities, and are called abstract nouns. Cited from The Grammar of English Grammars, by Goold Brown
  • For example within nouns there are two sub classes, concrete nouns and abstract nouns.
  • The abstract noun patriotism appears in the early 18th century.
  • The name is derived from an abstract noun related to royalty.
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